Program Sessions

Breaking Out of the Silos April 4-7, 2018
Breaking Out of the Silos
Waco Convention Center
Waco, TX

2018 AIA/CES Conference Session Participation Form

Thursday, April 5, 2018
8:30-9:30 am Opening Session
10:00-11:30 am Progressive Digital Learning Session
10:30-11:30 am Transformation: Turning Vision into Practice
Dr. Lane Ledbetter, Ed.D; Judy Walling; Russ Johnson

Ranger 106/107

In 2015, newly appointed superintendent, Dr. Lane Ledbetter, began developing his vision to prepare Midlothian ISD for rapid community growth and the development of student focused initiatives. Dr. Ledbetter and his leadership team will share what it took to become a District of Innovation, develop a new curriculum, pass a $268M bond, deploy student 1:1 devices, lead a community-wide #MISDproud branding effort, and promote a new culture of learning.

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to articulate the benefits of a strong, district strategic plan using lessons learned from panel members.
  • Participants will be able to understand the impact of a community-wide branding campaign as it relates to district staff, student, and community support for future initiatives using findings from a two-year marketing effort.
  • Participants will be able to link necessary components that should be a part of a wholistic digital learning initiative using models presented by panel members.
  • Participants will be able to discern the various outcomes associated with alignment of district strategies and programs using lessons learned from panel members.

Community-Driven Design: Breaking [Out Of The] Ground in Historic Fort Worth
Matt Davis, AIA; Gary Griffith, AIA, LEED AP; Mike Lyssy, AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Ranger 108/109

Two words that rarely find themselves in the same sentence: underground and learning. For the Van Zandt-Guinn Elementary School community, underground learning was the norm for more than 40 years. At the time of Fort Worth ISD’s 2013 Bond Program, this was the only remaining underground facility in the district and suffered from lack of natural light and maintenance concerns. As a part of the Bond Program, Fort Worth ISD and Perkins+Will collaborated to create a facility that would bring these students out of the ground and into the daylight – a facility that aligned with their vision to produce college-bound, future-ready students. The surrounding community, who embodied a proud and prestigious history, paid close attention and advocated for more than just a school, but also an around-the-clock, community center to meet their needs. The result was a physically elevated facility, stimulating their student’s future aspirations by framing industry and economy out their own windows. The quality and abundance of their learning environments were elevated, breaking conventional design standards by locating the media center on the top floor. This session will tell the story of a District’s ability to identify a problem, organize funding, engage a community, establish a partnership and create a solution – a story that many Owners and Designers intend to write every day.

Learning Objectives:
  • How outdoor spaces can be designed to provide secure, accessible and educational spaces.
  • How replacement schools can reinvent the success of their existing counterparts.
  • How designing / building in limited site areas can inform design solutions.
  • How zoning ordinances can play a part in the formation of outdoor space.

REIMAGINE & RECREATE
Hudson Huff; Sangeetha Karthik, AIA, RID, LEED AP BD+C, NCIDQ

Texas North 115

As our buildings age and the needs of students and teachers continue to evolve, renovations can provide opportunities for owners to reimagine their older facilities to support new and highly sought-after programs. Keller ISD executed this vision in the Keller Center for Advanced Learning, an intermediate school transformed into a state-of-the-art career and technical education center. This session will describe this bold venture between the owner, design team, construction manager and the community to create a cohesive facility that meets the needs of a growing district and furthers the district brand. The multi-phase project was performed in a fully occupied campus. The session will be a panel discussion.

Learning Objectives:
  • Optimize the benefits of using an existing building
  • Learn what affect phased constructions can have on design
  • Understand how different program strands can be collaborative if given the right physical space.
  • Understand the challenges of renovating an occupied campus.
1:00-2:00 pm Making Room – Furniture is not an after thought
Nicola Springer AIA LEED AP; Michael La Nasa; Michelle Old AIA

Ranger 106/107

This session will explore how a playful and collaborative programming process, can allow for the creation of unique and engaging learning spaces. By addressing the issue of furniture early in the design process, educators should think about not just having the right number of seats but the types of spatial arrangements and the quality of environments that engage all types of learners. This session will be in a work shop format where participants get to test an analog version of an interactive process that we hope to reproduce as an APP. Participants will learn about the value of considering the design and layout of furniture as part of their process, and some of the strategies for optimizing the spatial experience where educational design is concerned.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand how to layout furniture with universal design and accessibility in mind
  • Understand how to engage the user in creating and utilizing flexible learning spaces
  • How to specifying furniture for specialty spaces, libraries, maker spaces
  • Provide strategies for planning furniture layouts that work with the building design

Designing and Constructing High Performance Envelope for Schools
Eddy Santosa, CBCP, LEED AP BD+C, BEMP; Joe Fong, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP (BD+C); Eddy Santosa

Ranger 108/109

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Envelope design is a key component to creating sustainable, high-performing buildings. There are many strategies and design methods for schools that can be applied from design through construction to improve envelope design. The presentation will discuss specifically, the implementation of an Integrative Design Process and an Envelope Commissioning Process to meet the LEED requirements for K-12 schools. Better envelope design will have a direct impact on student performance by providing better thermal comfort, daylight and a healthy overall environment conducive to learning. The presentation will first describe the integrative design process, including the requirements of this process and various performance simulations that can be conducted to assess overall building performance. The presentation will also showcase the important strategies and key components that designers and performance modelers must focus on to develop a better a better envelope design. Per current codes and LEED requirements, Building Enclosure Commissioning (BECx) enhances the process of reviewing design documents, specifications, and submittals; makes recommendations for enclosure testing procedures, performing site observations and creating reports for any new construction and major renovation of K-12 projects with the goal of optimizing building performance. The presentation will also provide an interactive discussion with the audience to assess different types of sustainability strategies and envelope details. At the close of the presentation, there will be a Q&A session to address any final questions from the audience.

Learning Objectives:
  • Determine envelope performance parameters in early design that affect School's envelope design
  • Apply different strategies in order to improve envelope performance in School Projects
  • List the typical steps of Building Envelope Commissioning and understand the roles and responsibilities of a Commissioning Agent
  • Discover tools and techniques for addressing critical issues for building envelope case studies that are cost effective and support permitting and approvals

#AISDFuture – Building it Together
Beth Wilson; Melissa Laursen; Greg Smith

Texas North 114

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In November 2017, Austin voters approved the most ambitious bond in Central Texas history: $1.1B for Austin Independent School District to bring 21st century learning spaces to its students. The bond passed with overwhelming support from the community – 72% voter approval – the result of thoughtful collaboration and deliberate engagement with the community. With a portfolio of aging schools and deferred maintenance issues, a changing demographic landscape, and two of four previous bond propositions being disapproved by voters, AISD determined that change was needed and set out on an ambitious path to “Re-invent the Urban School Experience.” The effort began with a long-range facilities master plan (FMP). This living planning document set the vision and outlined strategies and actions for AISD to take over the next 25 years to transform the district and modernize schools. Realizing the magnitude of such an undertaking, AISD carefully deliberated and planned how the community would be actively involved in the effort. This presentation and active discussion will cover the specific strategies taken to develop the FMP, the 21st century means and methods of communicating with a large body of diverse community members, how to implement a collaborative process that is authentic but grounded in objective data, and other specific details that made this community engagement process successful. The session and room will be set up to replicate meeting methods utilized during the FMP process so that attendees can learn new best practices directly from participating and be able to apply to your next projects. A Facilities and Bond Planning Advisory Committee (FABPAC) member will participate in the session as well in order to speak to their role in the process representing the community at large. Session format: 10 minute Gallery Walk, 25 minute presentation, 25 minute panel discussion and audience Q&A.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn about the development and use of master planning guiding planning principles and strategies
  • Participants will obtain lessons learned on collaborating together on a new transformational vision for school facilities
  • Participants will understand new formats and structure for collaborating with the community and receiving feedback during a master planning process
  • Participants will learn case study examples of arriving at master planning project recommendations and closing the feedback loop with stakeholders.

Get Academic ROI on Your Facilities
Scott Layne; Jill Galloway; Irene Nigaglioni, LEED Accredited Professional, ALEP

Texas North 115

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Educators, learners, parents, and communities are continually chasing the dream of an ideal learning experience; an experience in which learners realize potential and emerge from school fully prepared to accomplish their highest hopes. Dallas ISD is working to make this dream a reality for their learners. The district partnered with engage2learn and PBK architects to reimagine the learning experience in Dallas ISD and actualize their vision through a long range technology and facilities plan. The project, aptly named by the district as “Envision Dallas ISD”, focused on encouraging community wide participation and communication to define a clear, shared belief about learning, developing a mission informed by new contexts for learning, creating a culture of student-centered learning, focusing on the highest effective use of technology to enhance teaching and learning, and ultimately connecting learning to the real world to better prepare learners for success. When districts commit to a large investment in their learning environments, they want to make sure their dollars are in the right place. To achieve the goal of an intentional, specific and strategic plan for the district and guarantee a return on investment in the district’s technology and facilities upgrades, e2L facilitated a three-phase process known as Learning Environment Design (LED©). The process began with a community engagement phase to develop a collaboratively-determined local vision for learning. This was accomplished through a variety of community outreach opportunities, where members from all district stakeholder groups came together to define the desired learning experience for the Dallas ISD community. The community engagement phase provided a critical foundation for all future decisions to be filtered through in order to maintain alignment to the central vision for learning. In phase two, a design team of Dallas ISD internal and external stakeholders analyzed the community input from phase one to develop a framework of the learning experience. A Dallas ISD student participating on the design team named this learning framework Dallas ISD Learning by Design. Next, the team used the engage2learn Learning Environment Assessment of Readiness & Needs (LEARN©) rubric to identify design principles for the classrooms. The framework and design principles were used to create the long range technology plan and informed the development of the long range facilities plan. During the last phase of work, members of an assessment team, comprised of an e2L facilitator and both district and campus administrators, utilized the LEARN© rubric to assess each campus’ ability to effectively support the behaviors defined in the learning framework. Specific needs were identified and aggregated to determine the most common needs by campus. All of the information gathered was consolidated into a master list of opportunities to improve the campus over the long term. The LEARN© rubric became the standard moving forward for decisions related to the learning environment to ensure all district initiatives and decisions were aligned to this framework for maximum impact. As the facilities assessment was completed, PBK architects led campus administration through a design process where new programming and facility modifications based on programming changes were designed into the current facility. This collaborative process allowed the campus leaders to understand and contribute to the possibilities for the long-range plan for that particular campus. All of these program modifications, LEARN© rubric assessment recommendations and life-cycle needs have been compiled into a master list of opportunities for the district to consider to improve each campus over the long-term. Several school districts have already benefited from the LED© process. In Fort Worth ISD, the community focused heavily on college and career readiness and as a result, the learning environment and learning framework were designed to cater to preparing students according to local job projections. The district has an 85.2% graduation rate and the goal is to increase that number significantly. They are continuing to work to increase certifications and career opportunities for graduates. In Alamo Heights the district has increased teacher retention, providing greater stability for students in the district. The design solution in El Paso ISD increased student engagement and standardized test scores. Mesquite ISD saw an improvement in readers on grade level from 78% to 87%. The process in Corpus Christi ISD resulted in 2 chronically underperforming campuses increasing significantly in rank in the state. The LED© process increases student engagement by providing an innovative, active learning environment that supports the learning experience needed to keep students both interested and successful in school. The local, collaborative vision and design addresses the needs of each individual district. The learning experience drives the design of the learning environment and the result is a collaboratively-designed, focused, and aligned structure for teaching and learning that is completely unique to each district. Through innovative furniture, careful technology planning, and thorough analysis of current facilities, every space is put to its highest effective use and every district dollar is a dollar towards the vision for ideal learning. Using this proven design process, educators are able to see reduced behavioral referrals as a result of aligned learning environments and instruction, along with an increase in standardized test scores and an overall improvement in critical skills. These results correlate to having a collaborative and student-oriented learning experience for the modern learning environment. Educators are able to differentiate student learning more effectively for better student outcomes as well. The process ensures that each district’s learner outcomes are achieved and that each community is growing learners exactly as envisioned.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn the process to create a learning environment based on student-centered learning experience to maximize academic ROI.
  • Discover impact on teacher/learner growth utilizing the LEARN© Rubric and Design Principles.
  • Summarize the community engagement process that leads to a collaborative, locally designed learning environment.
  • Identify ways to utilize existing resources and initiatives during design and implementation of an innovative learning environment.
2:30-3:30 pm The A4LE UTA School of Architecture Schools Studio Partnership
Donald F. Gatzke, AIA; Roberto Zúñiga, AICP; Anne Hildenbrand, AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Ranger 106/107

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Have you wondered why we are still designing schools the same way we did 100 years ago? Let’s stop wondering and engage our regional educators in a thought provoking discussion on the importance of research in educational facility planning and design. Learn how the A4LE UTA Schools Studio partnership did just that by developing innovative tools through the collaboration of students, facilitators, educators and practitioners. The studio’s intentions were...
  • To direct the activities and intellectual resources of a traditional architectural design studio towards the identification and dissemination of emerging issues in educational facility design that will impact this building type in the future;
  • To contribute to the collective knowledge base in school design and make it available to the profession;
  • To explore the implications of collected knowledge in the formal design process; and
  • To foster a knowledge based design process in the next generation of professionals.

We can build on this mission together by engaging at a local level to encourage research in education. This research will enhance our common goal of quality and innovation in educational facility planning and design. At the collegiate level, where creativity thrives, we have the freedom and energy to truly experiment and test this approach.

Learning Objectives:
  • Create a collaborative team that engages facilitators, educators and practitioners
  • Identify emerging issues in educational facility design that will impact this building type in the future
  • Contribute to the collective knowledge base in school design and make it available to the profession
  • Explore the implications of collected knowledge in the formal design process

Sharing HEARTS Across the Pond
Alfanso Padro, RIBA

Ranger 108/109

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Every school should have a HEART. London-based architect Alfonso Padro, RIBA will facilitate an interactive discussion on identifying the HEART of a school, and how it sets the pulse for all other scholastic systems. Learn how early cartoon sketches can help communicate concepts and meaning to stakeholder groups. Alfie will help compare methodologies, expectations, and designs. Learn about the procurement, planning processes, and results for several BSF Schools (British Schools for the Future).

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand how the HEART Concept can benefit early school planning and organization.
  • Learn how it can be central to themes of learning and community.
  • See different examples of HEART-like places that can inspire future thinking.
  • Discuss and compare US and UK similarities and differences.

Outdoor Learning Landscapes
Nicola Springer AIA LEED AP; Michelle Old AIA; Scott McCready

Texas North 114

Much in the same way that we program and design our indoor learning environments, outdoor learning spaces require careful attention to ensure that they foster, creativity, collaboration and critical thinking. They must be spaces that encourage these learning outcomes and allow students to explore the core curriculum. However, they are also needed as spaces of reflection and purveyors of a sense of community. They should be support systems for the local ecology and their contributions to the local community should spread outside of the campus boundaries. Houston’s hot humid climate might seem anathema to designing effective outdoor learning spaces. And in Texas these programmed outdoor spaces are certainly competition for the traditional land hogs - the sports field and parking lot. This presentation will focus on outdoor learning spaces for urban campuses primarily in the Houston area. Through a workshop format, we will explore strategies that encourage an interactive landscape of learning and play, and process how these much-needed spaces can stake their claim and advance their relevance as an equally important part of the learning environment.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand how to design for best solar orientation and airflow
  • Learn how to incorporate landscaped environments such as gardens into the core curriculum
  • Understand the value of outdoor learning environments for physical and mental health
  • How to incorporating civil and landscaping design to maximize resiliency.

Makerspaces: From Elementary Schools to College Campuses
Allie Schneider, IIDA, LEED AP ID+C; Gwen Morgan, IIDA, LEED AP ID+C; Stefanie Nguyen

Texas North 115

View presentation »

Once found primarily in schools of engineering, makerspaces are now a growing trend in all levels of educational facilities, from elementary to high schools and from technical schools to university libraries. Providing tools and materials, mentors and sponsors, they foster cross-pollination of disciplines, promote higher engagement with teams, and encourage the skills and abilities required for success in students’ future careers: ideation, collaboration, and exploration. Highlighting a variety of makerspaces across the country, this course will reveal current trends, share the benefits to users, and demonstrate successful design strategies for these creative community spaces.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the history of makerspaces as a tool for learning and creating community.
  • List different common styles of makerspaces, from industrial/technical shops to hoteling/collaborative workspaces.
  • Describe the features of a successful makerspace for different educational levels and specialties and the benefits of including one in a building.
  • Analyze the cross pollination of disciplines that takes place in makerspaces.
Friday, April 6, 2018
8:00-9:00 am Fostering Blended Work-Sharing Environments in Next Generation Schools
Patrick Glenn, AIA, REFP, LEED AP; Briar Glenn, AIA, LEED AP BD+C; Greg Estes, RA

Ranger 106/107

In today’s world, collaboration and creativity drives innovation. Leading corporations and industries around the world such as Apple, Google and Starbucks are changing how we work, communicate and live in our ever-changing and complex world. Collaborative think-tanks and research environments inspired by work-share companies such WeWork have a tremendous influence on next-generation productivity habits and working relationships with their blend of home and office. Research shows these highly sought after, collaborative and multi-faceted environments is driving productivity and communication while fostering critical social skills for today’s students. Learn how these simple ideas can be applied to your school to increase student engagement, collaboration, innovation and student performance.

Learning Objectives:
  • Audience will learn new planning ideas for softer and more flexible learning environments.
  • Participants will learn how leading companies around the world are changing the workplace environment to adapt to next-generational graduates.
  • Audience will learn how micro-office work-share environments breed a collaborative blend between home and work.
  • Participants will see authentic application of planning principles in relevant and relatable project examples.

Preparing, planning, and passing a bond: How Midlothian ISD used #MISDproud, technology, and campus safety to rally the community around a common purpose, learners!
Courtney Carpenter; Karen Permetti; Cindy Woody, Ed.D.

Ranger 108/109

At $268M and the largest comprehensive bond program in the history of the District, the bond package was put together by a volunteer Growth Management Committee (GMC) comprised of parents, grandparents, teachers and business leaders from across the MISD community. Using the MISD Strategic Plan as a guide, the committee conducted a comprehensive review of the current state of the District and evaluated trends in growth patterns. Hear from the Midlothian team and their partners on how they created a vision for how teaching and learning would be conducted and built a program that centered on that vision using social media to chronicle the journey and process.

Learning Objectives:
  • At the end of the program, participants will be able to articulate the importance of a strategic plan for the purposes of developing a bond program through the presentation of past efforts.
  • At the end of the program, participants will be able to recognize the best practices for developing and faciliting a bond planning committee to clearly shape capital needs of a district by reviewing the process and findings presented.
  • At the end of the program, participants will be able to understand the various methods to share the needs of the bond with the community using findings from a successful bond election.
  • At the end of the program, participants will have the knowledge to identify which technology systems align with district priorities based on provided modeling during the presentation.

STEPPING IT UP: ELEVATING THE DISTRICT BRAND
Eric Horstman, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP; Teri Wilson; Michael Longanecker, AIA

Texas North 115

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Schools have always been charged with representing the values of a community, but now as districts are under increased competition for students, furthering the brand of the district and individual campuses is a critical component for success. Architects and designers can advocate for districts by crafting campuses that elevate the district’s mission, attract students and families, embody community aspirations and foster innovative educational methodologies. Projects from Grand Prairie, Richardson and Fort Worth Independent School Districts will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives:
  • Discover the efforts three school districts have made to elevate their brand and connections to the community through interior and building design
  • Gain insight into the innovations and differentiators that students, parents and communities expect for their schools
  • Understand the direct impacts and influences that education architecture has on students, educators and the community
  • Develop skills in information mining, visioning, planning and curriculum integration to inspire future projects
8:30-10:00 am Progressive Digital Learning Session
9:15-10:15 am Integrating Campus Security into Environmental Design
Jennifer Quigley, ALEP I LEED AP BD+C; David Rider; Jeff Chapman, AIA, LEED AP

Ranger 106/107

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This presentation will focus on design techniques that school districts can utilize in order to create a more secure environment without becoming oppressive. Utilizing the expertise of actual law enforcement officers and design professionals, attendees of this session will learn meaningful strategies that have a direct impact on both students and educators by keeping schools secure without seeming like fortresses. An activity for attendees will be utilized to help underscore the lessons of the presentation.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the critical components of school security and how they are evolving with technology
  • Determine the strategies that help an educational facility remain secure while being accessible to those who use it.
  • Recognize which security strategies are applicable for each level of instruction
  • Analyze and respond to practice safety and security examples to understand their application.

From Cradle to Career: A deeper dive into the Educational Village Concept
Mark French, AIA, ALEP, LEED AP BD+C; Roy Sprague, AIA, ALEP, CSI

Ranger 108/109

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We’ve all heard the saying, “it takes a village to raise a child.” Where and when did this saying disappear from our public school system? While many private schools still offer full K-12 campuses that embrace learning from the cradle to career, public schools have seemingly categorized children based on age as opposed to stage. Join both educators and architects as we take a deeper dive into a recent, next generation educational village built in Houston, Texas. We will explore concepts such as the social emotional learning benefits to “growing up” on a campus, the types of shared learning experiences unique to an educational village, and the benefits of offering sage versus stage learning experiences to students.

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will have an understanding of the types of shared learning experiences that are supported by an educational village concept school campus
  • Participants will gain insight into the social emotional benefits of an Educational Village
  • Participants will understand why Educational Village concepts educate the whole child versus typical age categorizations
  • Participants will understand how Educational Village supports the Cradle to Career development of learners

A Look at Educational Facilities with Resilience in Mind
Todd Hanger AIA, LEED AP, BD+C; Megan Saunders LEED AP, BD+C, ND; Mark Madorsky

Texas North 114

View presentation »

Educational Facilities are asked to serve our communities in many ways. Operational from early morning to late at night, providing Next Generation learning opportunities, physical and mental health and well-being, community experiences within the arts and sciences, and competition sports, and shelter and rescue from natural and man-made disasters. This session will look at how school buildings can be designed to be physically, socioeconomically and ecologically resilient to acute and chronic adversities.

Learning Objectives:
  • Essential mindsets for achieving resiliency
  • Site & Environment design strategies for achieving resiliency
  • Building design strategies for achieving resiliency
  • Community design strategies for achieving resiliency

ARE YOU READY TO MAKE AN IMPACT?
Sangeetha Karthik, AIA, RID, LEED AP BD+C, NCIDQ; Briar Glenn, AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Texas North 115

The North Texas chapter of A4LE continues to impact students and educational environments through the annual Impact Award. This session will showcase the journey of the chapter that conceived and executed the award designed to engage and elevate the communities it serves. The chapter has raised and awarded thousands of dollars to local schools through this evolving program, developing a network of A4LE members, local schools, students and educators. The session is a window into the ongoing efforts to connect hard-working educators with funding they need to make an IMPACT. Audience members will interact with each other and the presenters by discussing needs in their community and brainstorming ways to implement a similar program in their chapter.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the chapters vision to improve educational environments and learning opportunities through award funds
  • Learn how the award has adapted to meet current pedagogical demands, ensuring the impacted education environment has ongoing benefit to students and staff
  • Gain the tools to develop this program in your own community with an understanding of their specific interior design, building and site needs
  • Understand what the next milestones for this award and how it’s impact can start a ripple effect for other communities.
10:30-11:30 am Community Engagement for School Design: A Cautionary Tale (and its resolution)
Daniel Kornberg, RA, LEED AP; James Harrison, RA, NCARB

Ranger 106/107

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School buildings provide safe, nurturing spaces for teaching and learning. Great school buildings become the hearts of their neighborhoods, beloved by parents and students. Great historical school buildings are icons in their communities. Raze one at your peril! In the fall of 2013, HarrisonKornberg Architects undertook the design of a new middle / high school on the site of a beloved community icon in Houston’s Historic Fifth Ward. The programming and design process included many community forums and PAT meetings, where the project’s design – and plan to demolish a historic school - were green-lighted. And yet, on the eve of construction, a community organization filed a court injunction that stopped the process dead in its tracks. The Design Team, forced to address new requirements, incorporated historical artifacts, concepts and teachable moments into its new design – and achieved a better outcome. This program describes how the existing historical structure was analyzed for suitability as a new school. It also discusses community engagement strategies for soliciting important feedback from all constituencies. The program also demonstrates how new 21st century school designs can capitalize on tradition, and create important connections to a community’s history.

Learning Objectives:
  • Attendees will be able to solicit active engagement from the Community when planning a new school project.
  • Attendees will understand how to evaluate if an historic structure can or can not be adapted to a new use as a school.
  • Attendees will have strategies for incorporating historical components (elements of historical significance), into the structure of a new building.
  • Attendees will have strategies for creating learning opportunities from historical and cultural context in a new, 21st Century school.

STEMA Vicenza – The student centered Vicenza High School charrette process
Mike Baker, AIA; RJ (Robert) Lopez, AIA, ALEP

Ranger 108/109

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Located on a US Army base in Vicenza Italy, the design of the new Vicenza High School embraces both the historical context of Italian architecture and the goals of the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) . “The goal of DoDEA is to design schools to meet 21st century learning objectives to include innovation in education, curriculum delivery, use of technology, and the requirements for sustainability and energy conservation. DoDEA requires schools of the future to be flexible and adaptable, allowing adjustments to new and innovative ways to deliver instruction and meet the needs of all students. A focus on quality must be maintained throughout the project including design and construction. The ultimate objectives for DoDEA are to deliver a project on time, within available funds, and in a safe manner, that satisfies the needs of the users.” (Excerpt from DoDEA Ed Specs) Learn how Parkhill Smith & Cooper more than “satisfied the needs of the users” through a fully immersive charrette process that lasted only one week. By working alongside students, teachers, parents, administrators, and approximately one dozen DoD related reviewers, the charrette team could push beyond initial investigation to a truly student centered conceptual design that surpassed expectations. While discussing the charrette process itself, we will also explore the unique opportunities that resulted from the project location such as the Italian building codes effect on the design and how the historical context of the area spurred learning opportunities throughout the building.

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to create a comprehensive client charrette schedule that increases both client feedback and design resolution
  • Participants will be able to identify both Department of Defense and Italian specific design requirements as it relates to school.
  • Participants will be able to employ multiple forms of both physical and technological devices to create working model studies for quick client review and approval.
  • Participants will be able to utilize 21st century design concepts while still complying with existing design regulation constraints.

POWER UP Dragons! The largest school building solar array in the nation, geothermal HVAC systems, daylight harvesting…Six years later, was building a “net zero” middle school worth it?
Brandon Patton; John Haugen; Matt Miller

Texas North 114

The new state-of-the-art Carroll Middle School opened in 2011 and was constructed to “net zero” standards. Because the district would share the facility with the community for after-hours and summer events, the school would never actually achieve “net zero” operations but the district still chose to include some of the latest green technologies available at the time including a 450KW solar PV array, geothermal HVAC system, daylight harvesting, LED lighting, reflective coated roof, and insulated coated glass. This award-winning project was one of the first Texas public school facilities to combine both a geothermal ground source heat transfer HVAC system and solar photo voltaic array at such significant levels, but how has this nearly “net zero” facility performed and what are the energy savings that have been achieved in the schools six (6) years of operation? Carroll ISD staff, the project architect, and construction manager will discuss the sustainable design decisions that were made, the additional costs of constructing a highly sustainable school facility and how the facility has performed since being put into operation. The team will look at the lessons learned and discuss with the audience the good and the bad and what would be done differently the next time.

Learning Objectives:
  • Attendees will learn what technologies proved their sustainable worth and which ones did not perform as expected based on actual performance statistics.
  • Attendees will explore the impact of the sustainable technologies on the operation, maintenance and performance of the school, ultimately saving the district $380,000 a year in energy costs.
  • Attendees will discuss and explore newer sustainable construction systems that were not incorporated into the design and what impact they might have had on the facility.
  • Attendees will be a part of the conversation to determine if the realized savings were worth the construction cost and what could be done differently after evaluating the building’s performance over the past six years.

Reimagining the Student Experience
Kate Mraw; Cecilia Gutierrez

Texas North 115

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This session will highlight the process and outcome of a research based design process. Attendees will virtually participate in an observational research dive to understand how the student voice can influence the redesign of any space on campus. In the heart of San Antonio, Alamo Heights High School is a historic campus that is treasured by so much of the community; the addition of a new Student Commons comes with an opportunity to reimagine the student experience & redefine life on campus. Throughout the master planning process, the District’s work in creating a Learner Profile was put to use as it helped inform and prioritize strategies for improving campus life. Additionally, the learner profile work informed the design of the student commons – as spaces that support social and global engagement and help students develop a healthy sense of self as they engage with peers in the Student Commons. Participants will understand how programmatic challenges can become opportunities by doing a deeper dive and designing with the student in mind.

Learning Objectives:
  • Through a participatory activity, participants will understand how observational research can influence a design outcome.
  • Understand how to create open space in an existing campus, particularly in an urban context with a tight campus site.
  • Understand the work of creating a learner profile to enhance student experience & how that context translates to an educational design response.
  • Recognize the influence of community use of the student commons, and how this programmatic priority informed design decisions.
Saturday, April 7, 2018
9:00-10:30 am Progressive Digital Learning Session
10:45 am-1:00 pm SchoolsNEXT Competition & Closing Panel
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