Program Sessions

April 10-13, 2014
FUTURE READY: Passion. Purpose. Perspective.
The Westin Galleria
Dallas, Texas

Friday, April 11, 2014 – 10:15-11:30 am
MAKERSPACE: Our World will be what They MAKE it
Angela Whitaker-Williams, Perkins + Will
Tommy Osborne, Perkins+Will
Catherine Dalton, Perkins+Will

Room: Austin III

The Makerspace movement spans STEM, CTE, robotics, art, and business in a way that fosters interdisciplinary exploration to identify and solve challenging, yet realistic problems. Making taps the technical and creative minds for an experimental play to generate and strengthen skills students need to thrive the new information/innovation economy. Join us as we explore how making cultivates discovery, critical thinking, collaboration, grit, and innovation as we relate to the Masters of Making, GOOGLE and IDEO.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand economic, social, and educational reasons why Makerspaces are crucial and conducive to future K-12 infrastructure and pedagogy.
  • Gain insights from some of the leading innovation companies in the US such as Google and IDEO.
  • Explore case studies of Makers in Action.
  • Reveal processes for creating a maker space and resources for support and step by step action plan.

Presenter Bios:

Angela Whitaker-Williams is a Senior Project Manager at Perkins+Will Austin with over 20 years experience in Educational Architecture. In graduate school, she spearheaded the first Maker Architects Week at Tulane bringing materiality to structural, artistic, and site problems. Her maker skills include: woodworking, welding, tiling, electrical, fiberglass, metalworking, photography, and videography. She had installations at Tulane, Texas A&M, University of Houston and published in Windows of Observation. She believes creativity is collaboration in materiality and meaning.

Tommy Osborne is a Senior Project Manager with 22 years of architectural planning and experience, 14 of those in the K12 market sector. Tommy has a true passion for educational design and comes from a family of educators, including his wife who are all teachers in the public school system. Tommy's leadership allows him to effectively collaborate with the school district and design team to produce complete and accurate construction documents on time and in budget.

Catherine Dalton is both an Architect and Interior Designer with 7 years of K-12 experience of which she strives to provide school districts with designs that are meaningful to their community, supportive of their mission, and bring value to their teaching environment. Catherine brings a passion for integrating vision and branding through all types of built environments from large scale exterior architecture to human scale interior components.
That's What She Said...The Power of Engagement in the Planning Process
Julie Barrett, Brailsford & Dunlavey

Room: Austin I

Asking the right questions is only half of the equation, engaging the correct team members provides better long lasting results. Investing time and effort into understanding the dynamics of a learning organization is tricking and requires skill not only in asking probing questions, but identifying the right team members to help the journey be memorable and one of success. Educational environments are expensive community investments providing a sense of place of generations. As schools are centers of communities and more and more emphasis is placed on the educational environment as teaching tools, what stakeholders do we engage, when do we engage them, and what questions should be probed in order for the results to be meaningful and investment worthy? This session engages stakeholders before the conference begins with a simple survey providing answers that will provoke conversation in a visioning session. The purpose of this workshop is to understand the perspectives of the instructional staff, administration, facilities members, and M & O team. Some ideas are exceptional, but may have unvetted consequences if all stakeholders are not present and asked the correct questions. The intent of this workshop is to create a shared vision that involves communities (students, teachers, parents) and administrators alike to have exceptional ownership of the learning experience and their school environment. The conclusion of this workshop is to ask the question, "Did we engage all those we needed and did we ask the right types of questions to create a learning environment that matters and that is purposeful?" This session will be facilitated and the audience members are the panel of experts.

Learning Objectives:
  • Relationship building is key before the planning process begins
  • Learning how to ask people what they want when they don't know they want it
  • Understanding varying perspectives in order to get the desired end result
  • Creating environments that matter through collaboration

Presenter Bio:

A Recognized Educational Facility Planner and Fellow, Ms. Barrett has actively engaged in a wide range of planning and development assignments throughout North America over the course of her 25-year career. Her passion is serving K-14 clients in the early development of projects including facilities master planning and educational specifications development, community outreach, visioning and consensus building, community college student services center and student life related projects. While possessing expertise in K-14 educational facility and capital improvement planning, she shares her proficiency with educators, administrators, and the business industry by teaching courses at the University of California Riverside, educational associations, and local school districts including Capistrano Unified School District. She is a recognized expert on the Theory of Multiple Intelligences, Teaching and Learning Styles, and Human Behavior. She is an active member of CEFPI serving as the Southwest Region's Board Representative and supports the Brailsford & Dunlavey's K-12 practice group.
Transforming a 30 year old high school for 30 more years
Vandana Nayak, AIA, Partner, SHW Group
Dr. Logan Ferris, Principal, McKinney ISD
Amy Galvan, SHW Group

Room: Laredo

McKinney ISD's existing 1980's high school was designed exclusively for the stand and deliver model of teaching. This once innovative high school incorporated Voc Ag programs along with fine arts, athletics and a natatorium. As times have changed, there became a need to change the existing high school to allow for new teaching and learning styles of the 21st Century and to accommodate the projected high school growth. Together with McKinney ISD, SHW Group set out to create a thoughtful transformation of McKinney High that empowers the students to adapt to new learning opportunities and help prepare each student for global community. SHW Group and McKinney ISD started by defining the vision for this transformation and then set goals for McKinney High. These efforts were followed by creating spaces that supported the cultural transformation envisioned for the high school. The challenge of adding 750 students, specific CTE programs, fine arts expansion, athletic expansion, and an overarching need to create meaningful engagement for each high school student, gave SHW the opportunity to explore conceptual student arrangement options with McKinney ISD. The study presented the pros and cons of arranging student populations in departmental houses or in small learning communities. Particular emphasis was paid on exploring varying degrees of integrated grade level houses and small learning communities. Options with and without media services helped determine the client's innovation scale for charting their future direction for learning and teaching. The exterior and interior of the building was modified to create a new image to reflect the school's vision and to allow for flexibility and innovation in operation. Comprehensive safety, security, and systems upgrades were also incorporated to increase operations efficiency, energy usage reduction, and improved user comfort. Join us to learn more about the option chosen by McKinney ISD to create small learning communities in its existing comprehensive high school and how this addition/renovation project allowed us to create a modern, student centric environment that supports 21st century learning.

Learning Objectives:
  • How to transform a older high school to accommodate 21 century learning
  • Different student arrangement options for a comprehensive high school
  • Process of Planning
  • Change in instruction's effect on facilities

Presenter Bios:

Vandana Nayak is a Partner at SHW Group LLP, a leading architectural firm that is reputed for innovative educational designs. Vandana has lead a wide variety of K-12 and Higher Education projects from planning to construction. Her projects have received several awards including the AIA-CAE citations, honor award by AIA Dallas, finalist of McConnell award; and have been published in Architectural Record, Texas Architects, and School and Planning magazine. She is currently the chair of USGBC Students Group of North Texas Chapter. She has served as Co-Chair of AIA Dallas Education outreach committee, Member 2010 AIA Dallas Integrated Practice, and Member 2009 AIA Dallas Emerging Leaders Program. She and her husband live in Coppell and enjoy raising their two sons.

Dr. Logan Ferris is the principal of McKinney High School. He has been with McKinney ISD for six years serving till recently as Principal of Dowell Middle School where he led the campus of 1200 students. Under his leadership Dowell was recently named the 2012 Intel Schools of Distiniction Finalist for their innovation in math instruction. Dr. Faris earned his Bachelor of Science, Master of Education and Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership degrees from Stephen F. Austin University. His doctoral dissertation, The Teacher's Voice: Narratives of an Empowering School Culture, focused on teacher empowerment. Dr. Faris has also served as Adjunct Graduate Professor for the College of Education at Dallas Baptist University since 2008.
Friday, April 11, 2014 – 1-2:15 pm
Continuing the Conversation with David Houle
David Houle

Think Tank: Updating the Texas Education Agency's Facility Standards
Rob Caudill, TEA
Gary B. Marek, REFP, TASB
Frank S. Kelly, FAIA, SHW Group

The Texas Education Agency is planning to update standards for school facilities under 19 Texas Administrative Code §61.1036. We are particularly interested in ensuring that the standards, which were last updated in 2004, are well aligned with current curriculum requirements and best practices. We also want to account for the ways that technology has and will continue to affect needs for educational facilities. The current facility standards will be presented in sections and the input from the audience will be requested.

Learning Objectives:
  • Gain input concerning the TEA's facility standards
  • For the audience to become more familiar with TEA's facility standards
  • Learn more about the audiences concerns about the TEA's facility standards
  • Answer any questions concerning the TEA's facility standards

Presenter Bios:

Rob Caudill is a systems analyst in the Texas Education Agency's School Finance Office and has worked in other TEA divisions since 2004. Rob was marketing analyst for 20 years prior to 2004. Rob earned a bachelor's of Industrial Engineering from Georgia Tech in 1980 and earned an MBA from the University of North Texas in 1987.

Gary Marek is a Facilities Consultant with the OnSite Facilities Services Program at the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB). Prior to joining TASB in December 2012, Gary served as Director of School Facilities for the Texas Education Agency (TEA), where he oversaw the School Facilities Standards, the Science Lab Grant program, the Qualified School Construction Bond program, the Qualified Zone Academy Bond program, and the School Transportation Allotment program. Gary's career with the State of Texas began in 1984. Prior to joining TEA in December 1998, he worked for the General Services Commission in the Facilities Leasing Section for seven years. His first eight years in State government were spent enforcing accessibility laws with the Architectural Barriers program of the General Services Commission and the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. Gary has an undergraduate degree in Architectural Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, and a Master of Business Administration degree from Southwest Texas State University. Gary is a Recognized Educational Facility Planner and currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Central Texas Chapter.
Friday, April 11, 2014 – 2:45-4 pm
UTA Architectural Students
Don Gatzke, UTA

Room: Austin II

Calculating Capacity for 21st Century Schools
Sue Robertson, Houston ISD

Room: Austin III

The PURPOSE of calculating program capacity is to insure that the number of students who need to be served at a school site or the aggregate number for the district are aligned with enrollment projections. Based on our recent experience in planning over 20 high schools this year in Houston ISD, it appears that a new PERSPECTIVE on the calculation methodology is needed. This session will provide an opportunity for the participants to share their PASSION for the effective development and use of this essential planning tool.

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will understand terminology used in capacity calculation.
  • Participants will discuss traditional methodologies for calculating capacity.
  • Participants will discuss potential impacts of 21st Century Learning models on capacity calculation.
  • Attendees will participate in an exercise calculating the capacity of a high school using traditional methodology as well as an alternate approach.

Presenter Bio:

Ms. Robertson integrates experience in the fields of education and design in her work as an educational planner. She has a Bachelor's degree in elementary education and has worked as an educator from elementary through university levels and a Master's degree from Florida State University in Interior Design. As an educational planner, Ms. Robertson has assisted numerous districts in facility assessments, developing educational specifications, and district-wide master planning. In 2001 Sue formed Planning Alliance, a corporation that provided facility planning services for K-12, higher education, and business clients. Sue is currently the General Manager, Facility Planning, for Houston Independent School District is responsible for overseeing the planning for a recently-passed $1.89 billion bond-funded building program. She a past-president of CEFPI, and is co-author of Creating Connections.
Building Wholesome Communities
Steven Bingler, Concordia LLC

Room: Austin I

This session will focus on "systems thinking", exploring the latest and most advanced thinking about urban and rural planning, with an emphasis on community and school planning as an integrated and community driven process. The session will explore ways to accomplish these systemic connections through greater interaction between state, county, city, and school facilities planners, and the importance of a systemic analysis of all physical, cultural, social, educational, organizational and economic components of community life.

Learning Objectives:
  • Exploring some principles of Systems Thinking and their applications to school planning, urban planning and disaster recovery, health and safety.
  • Exploring natural concepts of "emergence&qquot; and their application to stakeholder organizing and community capacity building post-disaster.
  • Exploring the interface between school facilities planning and urban design through an advanced integrated planning model.
  • Exploring the role of students with respect to school facilities and community development.

Presenter Bio:

Steven Bingler is the founder and President of Concordia. Under his leadership, Concordia's projects have spanned a wide range of building types, including educational, office, museum, retail, and housing. Concordia's award winning planning and design work has appeared in many national publications, including Architecture, Interiors Magazine, Architectural Digest, Newsweek, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, USA Today and the Wall Street Journal. Steven has also served as a special consultant to the Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education for research and development of the policy document: "Schools as Centers of Community: A Citizen's Guide. Other notable research projects include Concordia's partnership in the publication of "Dollars and Sense: The Cost Effectiveness of Small Schools", and "Dollars & Sense II: Lessons from Good, Cost-Effective Small Schools", at the behest of the KnowledgeWorks Foundation, the Rural Schools and Community Trust, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Research and Development alliances have included the MIT Media Lab, Harvard University's Project Zero, the University of New Mexico, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Thornburg Institute, the Appalachian Education Lab and the West Ed Lab. Steven is also a frequent speaker at national and international symposia and conferences related to Concordia's systemic and community centered approach to urban planning and architectural design. His personal interests include woodworking, music and travel.
Exploring the future of our school facilities and the role of the Architects in providing learning environments that support the education mission
Moderator
Kristabel Lopez, AIA, Jacobs Engineering

Speakers/Panelists:
Lisa Lamkin, AIA, BRW Architects
Briar Hannah, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Architect, Corgan Education Studio
Patrick Glenn, AIA, REFP, LEED AP, Perkins + Will

Room: Laredo

A panel of experienced Architects, specializing in educational facilities throughout the Southern Region, and particularly in North Texas, will provide a candid evaluation of where our school buildings are when comparing to the national trends, a fresh look into the classroom/school of the future in alignment with public education policies, and a practical approach to increasing quality in design and construction while keeping within current constraints. Each panelist will present a case study that addresses new initiatives being implemented by school districts in this area and how the designs respond to changing conditions regarding funding, approach, curriculum, technologies, safety, sustainability, building reuse etc.

Learning Objectives:
  • We will challenge architects to think outside the box. Our students deserve a fresh look and perspectives
  • We will present solutions being implemented in other places that are providing outstanding results
  • We will discuss innovative trends developed in collaboration with North Texas school districts
  • We will present case studies and bring our client's perspectives into the conversation

Presenter Bio:

Briar Hannah is a Project Architect with the Corgan Education Studio. Through Briar's contagious leadership and creativity, she is able to challenge clients to think beyond what a typical school can become and how we can make responsible and sustainable decisions to support our global environment. Her unwavering stewardship helps foster fresh ideas and innovative design solutions to support a 21st century educational environment.
Saturday, April 12, 2014 – 8:30-9:45 am
A Student's Learning Dashboard Is Uniquely Their Own
Darren L. James, KAI Texas
Jim Brady, Page
Elke Giba, Giba Group

Room: Austin II

The future of learning incorporates a multi-faceted educational environment — contextual and digital — that provides students an engaging and individualized learning experience and that prepares them for college or a career. For in the future, each student will have their own learning story. Business leaders readily share that recent graduates are often not prepared adequately for the workforce, regardless of their educational track. How can future-ready educational environments prepare students to meet these varying demands of success? This session focuses on the multi-faceted aspects of the learning environment needed for 21st century learning; real-world context, with both global and local community connections. This interactive session begins with an online discussion on CEFPI-connect prior to the conference to identify additional successful concepts from around the world where multi-faceted environments are already at work. These findings will become a part of the interactive conversation with conference participants as a means to further the dialogue in making Future Ready Schools. As a follow-up to this session’s discussion, an interactive "iPaper" will be produced and shared on CEFPI-connect to foster a continuing dialogue in making Future Ready Schools.

Learning Objectives:

  • Have an understanding of what is a contextual future-ready learning environment
  • Have an understanding of some of the challenges of moving forward and how to approach them
  • Learn of solutions of successful Future-Ready school facilities
  • Share resources to become a champion for Future-Ready schools that are learning focused

Presenter Bios:

Darren James is President and COO of KAI Texas, a Texas-based design-build firm. Darren is a noted architect, speaker, and author, with educational facility design articles appearing in School Construction News, American School & Hospital Facility, School Planning & Management. He serves as Project Principal for all of KAI's current education-related endeavors, most notedly San Antonio's Sam Houston High School, Irving's John R. Good Elementary School, and Dallas' Billy Earl Dade Middle School.

With four decades in education as an architect, planner and educator/practitioner, Jim Brady's career has centered on collaborative models for development of strategic and facility plans, development of educational specifications focused on teaching and learning strategies, and leadership development. He recently returned to Page as their P-14 knowledge leader. Jim is a 32 year member of CEFPI and was honored by CEFPI in 2004 as their International's Planner of the Year.
Building for Future Ready Students
Carla Amacher, Round Rock ISD
Alan Albers, Huckabee

Room: Austin III

Join us as we explore the relationship between best instructional practices, state standards, and building features that support student learning. Specifically, we'll discuss the neighborhood concept, the power of transparency throughout a school, and the value of flexible space versus dedicated science/computer lab space. Round Rock ISD evolved its Elementary School design over 8 years with 3 bond elections and construction periods. In that time, seven prototype elementary schools were designed and built with an intent to evolve each to match an evolving educational delivery method. Among areas in the design modified was to evolve from conventional separate science and art rooms to constructing a collaborative space within each pod or grade-level area of rooms to allow and promote collaborative learning embedded in the classroom learning environment. The Round Rock ISD Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education and former Executive Director for Facility Services will discuss how the district used a purposeful design process to construct the desired spaces and then selected Administrators who were focused on exploiting the design to achieve the desired processes.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of building design supporting instructional design
  • Explore the value of grade level clustering around a common shared area
  • Discuss the relationship between differentiation of instruction and flexible space
  • Value the Principal's perspective on transparency, flexibility and functionality of school design

Presenter Bios:

Carla Amacher has served twenty years in public education, evenly split between McKinney and Round Rock ISDs. Her time in McKinney was as a teacher, instructional technology coordinator and principal. Currently she is the Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Education for Round Rock ISD, supporting the work of thirty-three elementary principals. During the past seven years she has worked closely with RRISD construction leaders on the design of six elementary schools. Carla Amacher is the Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education for the Round Rock Independent School District. She has served as an elementary teacher and Principal in McKinney ISD and as a Principal in Round Rock ISD before assuming her present role. As Round Rock ISD has been a fast-growth district since the mid-90's, the rapid growth has resulted in Round Rock ISD building a number of elementary schools. Carla has been fully involved in the design of the elementary schools built during that time as well as the hiring of Principals who were able to move the district into the 21st Century learning styles desired. Mrs. Amacher received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Education and Master 's degree from Texas A&M University and is widely recognized as a leading-edge educator among her peers.

Alan Albers is an Educational Facility Consultant with Huckabee Associates. In that role, Alan assists school districts with bond planning and project prioritization. Prior to his duties at Huckabee, Alan served as the Executive Director, Operations & Facilities for the Round Rock Independent School District for 15 years. Being in a fast-growth district, Alan facilitated the construction of over $750M of educational facilities in that time and was known for being very purposeful in including the educational staff in the design of every school built during this period. A prime example of his focused inclusion of staff was the evolution of the district's elementary school design. The prototypical design that evolved was repeated a number of times and is seen as the district's example to be emulated today. Alan received his degree in Mechanical Engineering from Texas A&M University and was a founding member of the Certified Educational Facilities Planner (CEFP) designation when CEFPI moved to that certification process. He's been a member of CEFPI since 2000 and has served as President of the Southern Region and North Central Texas Chapter.
School of the Future Design Competition
SOTF Team
Matthew Lincheck, Sheldon ISD

Room: Austin I

The Deconstruction of Today's Classroom & The Metaphysics of Tomorrow's Learning Environment
Gary Rademacher, Huckabee
Konrad Judd, Huckabee
Tim McClure, Huckabee
Jennifer Brown, Huckabee

Room: Laredo

Public school districts are often challenged to reduce construction costs, reduce energy consumption and maximize efficiency. Many times this leads to the use of tried and true materials and methods. This presentation will provide attendees with three examples of the use of non-traditional K-12 solutions on public school district projects. In 2006, Huckabee was presented with an opportunity to research and potentially implement a product newcomer to the marketplace. This product would eventually become the standard bearer for exterior wall construction in Texas K-12 Educational building even though its roots are in hotel and small commercial construction. Huckabee conducted extensive research of a Kentucky school district using the product. As a result, the first Texas public educational facility to be constructed using ICF was completed. Subsequently, a number of school districts in Texas have begun using ICF in their buildings. We will discuss the benefits, cost savings opportunities and appropriate uses of the ICF product in a school facility. Learning takes place in many different ways in many different places. We can look to different facility types such as residential and retail for inspiration in creating innovative learning environments in public schools. For instance, people across the world do some of their best work in the comforts on their living rooms, and rooftop gardens have also become popular in urban environments. Drawing from the retail environment, the Apple "Genius Bar" has become synonymous with unparalleled technology expertise, and Barnes and Noble has created an environment where you can order coffee and a scone while you search for a book to read. We will discuss how these concepts can improve the learning environment in public schools, and the benefits each of these solutions provides for students to learn in an individualized manner. With legislation and local initiatives, school districts are constantly challenged to meet the needs of students related to college and career readiness. As school districts strive to best prepare students for their future, innovative programs more often seen at the higher education level are finding their way into the high school curriculum. Career and Technology programs across the State are incorporating creative pathways so students can explore future career opportunities or degree plans while earning credits or certifications. We will share examples of innovative programs in the north Texas area and discuss the positive impact on students by providing them in high schools. Innovation is defined as the process of introducing new ideas or methods. Creative thinking paired with research can spur innovation and provide students with new ways to learn and succeed.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn what construction methods with roots in hotel construction can benefit school districts
  • Learn When to utilize design solutions inspired by residential and retail projects to benefit students
  • Learn How unique programs in higher education can benefit student's futures
  • Learn Where to use successful alternative methodologies in K12 projects

Presenter Bios:

Gary Rademacher is one of our most esteemed principals, in large part due to his easy-going personality and unwavering commitment to client service. Under his leadership, Huckabee implemented an internal advisory committee with the sole purpose of making sure our clients are receiving ample attention and top-notch service. Gary is currently working with the Hurst-Euless-Bedford, Grapevine-Colleyville, Kaufman and Greenville school districts as a listening leader to solve their facilities problems while demonstrating economic responsibility. He is a recent recipient of a prestigious TAPE Gold Award, which recognize volunteers whose commitment to education partnerships have made a positive impact on the youth in their community. Not surprisingly, Gary was nominated for this award by one of his clients for his involvement with starting and coaching an intramural soccer league for at-risk boys.

With over 20 years of educational facility design, Konrad Judd is Huckabee's Director of Design. He has led the design of hundreds of school projects throughout the U.S. and Mexico, and is an internationally-recognized thought-leader in educational architecture. Through careful, thoughtful design, Konrad works with school districts to create facilities that not only support instruction and its evolution, but also encourage it, offering today's students the learning spaces that will help them thrive. Konrad believes that, as the approach to education changes to meet the needs of society and the workplace, so must facilities. To design learning environments that are relevant, both now and in the future, today's schools need to provide the users with choices. Konrad and the Huckabee design team affirms this notion of choice by incorporating design concepts like flexibility, differentiated settings, transparency, current and emerging technologies and relevant, real world aesthetics into the design of our school facilities.

Tim McClure's experience in construction and architecture spans more than 20 years. His expertise in construction stems from working on residential and small commercial projects prior to entering the architectural profession. This background in construction, combined with his extensive experience in construction administration and expertise in producing detailed construction documents, allows him to serve in a project leadership role with an unmatched capacity. As a Principal at Huckabee, Tim oversees projects from start to finish, from the initial planning process and design phases, through construction. Tim is also passionate about positively impacting student learning environments while consistently exceeding the client's expectations.
Saturday, April 12, 2014 – 10-11:45 am
Updating the Texas Education Agency's Facility Standards
Rob Caudill, Texas Education Agency

Room: Austin II

SHIFT IN PERSPECTIVE: HISTORIC BUILDINGS TO FUTURE READY SCHOOLS
Lisa Lamkin , BRW

Room: Austin I

What the Flip! The kitchen table has been moved to the classroom
Jim Brady, AIA, CEFP, Associate Principal, Page
Wendy Heger, AIA, LEED AP, Associate Principal, Page

Room: Austin III

Flipped Classrooms are an engaging instructional strategy that is being implemented with success. This session provides you with the background of why, when, who and how "flipped" evolved and what are the facility design and FFE implications to be future ready. Are you ready to flip?

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn the opportunities for students success of a flipped classroom.
  • Understand the back ground of a flipped classroom- the who, how, when and why.
  • Learn about key resources that support those that "flip"
  • Facility and FFE implications for Flipped Classrooms

Presenter Bios:

With four decades in education as an architect, planner and educator/practitioner, Jim Brady's career has centered on collaborative models for development of strategic and facility plans, development of educational specifications focused on teaching and learning strategies. He recently returned to Page as their P-14 knowledge leader. Jim is a 32 year member of CEFPI and was honored by CEFPI in 2004 as their International's Planner of the Year.

Wendy Heger serves as a Project Manager for Page, handling a variety of high-profile assignments including the current North Forest High School for Houston Independent School District. She has 10 years of architectural experience with public projects, and eight years as a facilities Owner's Representative. Wendy has also served as Project Architect on projects for Rice University and University of Houston.
Space Planning Like Google and Harvard
Monte Hunter, Parkhill Smith & Cooper

Room: Laredo

See how your district can plan facility space in a quick and cost effective manner using predictive analytics similar to Apple, Fidelity Investments, Google, Harvard University and IBM. This method forecasts how much space will be needed in your district to accommodate needs and emerging educational programs.

Learning Objectives:
  • The use of predictive analytics in everyday life
  • How to use peer data to benchmark existing space
  • How to use predictive analytics in space planning
  • Justifying space needs using peer data & predictive analytics

Presenter Bio:

Monte Hunter: 2006 Winner of CEFPI Impact on Learning Award Licensed architect in Texas and New Mexico Published in AS&U Magazine for facility metrics Speaker at previous CEFPI conventions TASA/TASB convention speaker on facility metrics SCUP convention speaker on facility metrics Speaker at NSSEA Convention on facility metrics 34 years of educational facility planning experience Provided planning services for 30+ districts.
Saturday, April 12, 2014 – 1-2:15 pm
Passion Based Learning: Creating a Culinary Masterpiece
Briar Hannah, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Architect, Corgan
Dr. Alma Charles, Fort Worth Independent School District
Chef Timothy M. Kelly, Fort Worth Independent School District

Room: Austin II

Join us as we explore the interdisciplinary culinary program and new facility at Fort Worth ISD's North Side High School; a program that encompasses a blended learning experience for students while supporting their future professional interests and passions. Our presentation will highlight the collaborative program that was developed to promote the hands on learning experience where students will have the opportunity to work side-by-side with industry professionals, participate in culinary competitions and gain invaluable experience for immediate job entry or postsecondary education in the culinary arts. In addition, we will have a panel discussion that includes the FWISD CTE Director, FWISD Education & Training Coordinator, and a NSHS Teacher and Student.

Learning Objectives:
  • How creative school planning can cultivate Passion Based Learning.
  • How Project Based Learning enhances the teaching and collaborative learning environment.
  • How collaboration between CTE curriculums fosters an interdisciplinary educational experience.
  • How integration of real world opportunities prepare students to be future industry professionals.

Presenter Bios:

Briar Hannah is a Project Architect with the Corgan Education Studio. Through Briar's contagious leadership and creativity, she is able to challenge clients to think beyond what a typical school can become and how we can make responsible and sustainable decisions to support our global environment. Her unwavering stewardship helps foster fresh ideas and innovative design solutions to support a 21st century educational environment.

Dr. Alma Charles holds a Bachelor of Science in Occupational Training and Development, Master of Science in Educational Administration, in Occupational Training and Development and in Curriculum & Instruction from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Texas A&M University-Kingsville. As the Director for Career & Technical Education (CTE) in Fort Worth ISD, she manages a budget of over $20 million and supports 250 CTE teachers.

Timothy Kelly's culinary career spans more than 25 years and he has a varied experience in a most diverse culinary industry; from working and training in the industry to marketing and consulting, to educating the next generation of food service professionals. In February of 2011, he left the classroom and joined the ranks of school district administrators accepting an offer from Fort Worth ISD as Career and Technology Education (CTE) Coordinator.
Aggressively Passive - Future of Cool in School
Nicola Springer, Kirksey Architecture
Kapil Upadhyaya, Kirksey Architecture
Jody Henry, Kirksey Archietcture

Room: Austin I

Passively designed buildings are climate-responsive, socially-responsible and financially-sound investments but it takes 'outside the box' thinking to design, build and maintain one. A Closed Box of brick & glass does not reflect the 'Future of Education'. It does not care about climate, site or even occupants. Undeniably, we in the education sector have become very good at creating clusters of Closed Boxes and calling these a School. Our presentation challenges some of the usual assumptions about school buildings, students & teachers, and habits in general. It also challenges the 80 year old 'cooling' trick that still works. With detailed climate assessment of Houston & Dallas, it shows how Passive Strategies for environmental-control invariably need an Integrated Planning approach. With Case Studies we will show that an Integrated Planning approach not only leads to Climate-responsive Buildings, but also brings about a: - Socially-responsive institution: that offers educational & scholarship opportunities for students; - Healthier environment: for aging communities; - Financially-sound investment: by eliminating first-costs and operational costs. These 3 case studies exemplify how Passive Strategies are helping create communities that go much beyond 'Green'. With the help of simulation results & calculations, we will demonstrate how some of these strategies were employed in the design of buildings. Special emphasis will be paid to clo factor, air flow, radiant temperature, illuminance and carbon-dioxide concentration. Subsequently, with measurements from post-occupancy evaluation, we will demonstrate how these strategies are faring while still leaving some unique challenges to be overcome. Lastly, we will tie the changing habits of students and teachers to the new kind of school environments that will be needed in the near future - flexible, modular and resource-efficient. Overall, the presentation is broken into 12 parts with changing modes of interaction that will continuously keep the audience engaged. Besides lecture using power point slides, these will include: - a short video on 'The 80 year old trick that still works' - a short group exercise called 'Lets solve a problem or Lets avoid it ' - a short individual exercise called ' Lets calculate comfort'.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify operational & principal savings associated with Passive Strategies for environmental-control.
  • Identify climate-responsive design solutions and operational procedures for buildings that use Passive Strategies.
  • Calculate and/or estimate Clo factor, Air Flow speeds & Radiant Temperature that are used in building design.
  • Identify specific problems associated with closed and conditioned buildings: ventilation, thermal distribution, condensation and energy wastage.

Presenter Bios:

Nicola Springer is a Vice President at Kirksey Architecture and leads the Education Pre-K thru 12 team. Nicola holds a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from Princeton University and a Masters of Architecture from Rice University. Nicola has spoken at CATEE 2010, at USGBC Green Schools Symposium Austin 2012, and at CEFPI Southern Region Conference 2009. She has facilitated interactive brainstorming sessions for AIA Houston and for Kirksey's annual "Classroom of the Future" workshops.

Kapil Upadhyaya is a Building Energy Analyst and has facilitated more than 60 LEED projects with building performance simulation, ROI analysis, measurement & verification and post-occupancy studies. Kapil holds a B.Arch with Honors from IIT Kharagpur and a Master of Science from TAMU. His research on Optical Light Pipes was published at PLEA, Dublin, 2008. Kapil has presented at CATEE 2013, TCUF 2010, 16th Symposium on Hot Humid Climates, Green NC 2013 Symposium, Gulf Coast Green 2012.

Jody Henry is an associate at Kirksey Architecture and has more than 12 years of experience in educational buildings. She was the Project Manager for Gloria Marshall Elementary School, the first LEED Gold public school in Houston, Texas. She was a board member of the USGBC Texas Gulf Coast Chapter from 2003 – 2009, and in 2011 was named a Houston Green Hero by the USGBC. She speaks nationally on the benefits of healthy and high performance educational facilities.
The Collaboratorium: Designing Problem-Solving Spaces for Learning and Investigation
Gregory Louviere, PBK

Room: Austin III

A Collaboratorium is a live dynamic collaborative space and experience where teams of teachers, students or professionals share their knowledge, talents, and ideas to challenging problems that are often unsatisfactory solved in a linear manner. The Collaboratorium employs solution-based "design thinking" features such as discovery, iteration, prototyping and implementation to allow for participants to engage and promote interactions. The success of a Collaboratorium depends heavily upon the interaction of team members and the design thinking strategy. It is equally important to realize that the setting of a Collaboratorium setting is not just about a series of seminar or conference rooms with projection and marker boards where people can sit and meet. Rather, the setting must be well-considered and equipped with the optimum spatial qualities, tools, technology and performance criteria required to make the event meaningful, interactive and valuable to the participants and the outcome. In recent years, many institutions such as MIT, University of Chicago and numerous cutting edge businesses have built and installed collaboration spaces to investigate such broad-based problems such climate change, sustainability, economic globalization, business growth and entrepreneurship. This presentation will explain the uses and design of the Collaboratorium, the varied types of spaces of which it is comprises, and the reasons for its current proliferation among universities, corporations, institutions and learning environments using primary and secondary research sources. The author will also show the programming investigation process to design a collaboratorium and a maker-space project. A final part of the presentation will examine the future opportunities and various uses for collaboratorium spaces by regions, districts, business and state educational organizations.

Learning Objectives:
  • Designing Learning and Investigative Spaces
  • "Design Thinking" strategies
  • Organizational employment of collaboratorium spaces
  • Criteria for designing a Collaboratorium

Presenter Bio:

Currently employed at PBK as an Associate Principal in the design department, Gregory Louviere's work focuses upon innovative learning, teaching and workplace environments. His duties includes research, programming, space planning, presentation and interior design. It has been his pleasure to present at numerous conferences and attend numerous conferences as well. He has been involved with many projects that received design awards recognition.
Changes to Planning and Design Process in the 21st Century – Alvin ISD High School #3
Jeff Couvillion, CTSBO, Alvin ISD
Erin Machac, AIA, SHW Group
Tracy Eich, AIA, Partner, SHW Group
Amy Galvan, SHW Group

Room: Laredo

Learning environments are evolving more rapidly than we could have imagined, as we are now well into the 21st Century, no longer on the cusp. Our planning and design process', however, have tended to remain the same. The duration of each phase, our goals, and our overall concepts of Planning, Schematic Design, and Design Development must adapt the same as the learning environments they are now trying to communicate. Presentation will be on changes to planning process for today's learning environments, with a case study of Alvin ISD's new High School #3, including continuation of pre-design and design process' through construction, into use of the facility and for the life of the building. Included within discussions will be need for, and use of, instructional, technology, FF&E, and other beta sites while construction is underway on new facility, so that all staff is better prepared for the progressive learning environments, beyond opening day.

Learning Objectives:

 

  • Review differences in typical planning and design process for progressive, future-ready projects
  • Discuss how planning process extends into (and beyond) design on special projects, review risks and rewards of this overlap
  • Review options for better preparation of staff, with regards to opening of progressive learning environments
  • Discuss how to better anticipate unknown change

Presenter Bios:

Jeff Couvillion is Director of Building Programs at Alvin ISD and has contributed in the completion of over $250M in construction projects during the last 11 years. He believes in providing facilities that are supportive of a quality instructional program that maintain the form, function, and long term value for Alvin ISD. Jeff is a graduate of Alvin Community College, Lamar University, a member of CEFPI, and a Certified Texas School Building Official.

As a graduate of Texas A&M University, Erin Machac has more than 15 years of experience managing projects for SHW Group. He excels due to his attention to detail and consistent delivery in a client-focused manner. Erin is a Registered Architect and member of the American Institute of Architects, Council for Educational Facility Planners International, Texas Society of Architects and the U.S. Green Building Council. In 2012, he received the Southern Region Cornerstone Award.

Tracy Eich, Partner at SHW Group, is a Principal Designer for clients in Houston, Texas and across the nation. With over 20 years of experience serving both K12 and Higher Education markets, his talent is listening to clients, and their diverse stakeholders, to create a design that transforms the existing condition to a high performance learning environment that meets the instructional objectives, with a keen eye on reducing operational costs in an aesthetically pleasing way.
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