Sessions

Creativity. Curiosity. Imagination— The Changing Tides of Education March 18-20, 2019
Creativity. Curiosity. Imagination— The Changing Tides of Education
Francis Marion Hotel
Charleston, SC

Tuesday, March 19, 2019 | 8:30 – 10:00 AM
Keynote: Minimally Adequate
Carolina Ballroom

    1 LU

Speaker:
Paul Bowers, Reporter, The Post and Courier

South Carolina’s schools trail other states by nearly every measure, leaving students unprepared for the world that awaits them as businesses struggle to find qualified workers to fill skilled jobs, a Post and Courier investigation has found.

South Carolina tumbled last year in the national rankings in almost every category of a test known as “the nation’s report card.” Its fourth graders did worse on math and reading than their counterparts in Mississippi, a state that spends less per pupil and has the nation’s highest poverty rate.

South Carolina faces many of the same challenges as other Deep South states, including entrenched poverty, a stark urban-rural divide and a tradition of segregation.

South Carolina has allowed its schools — particularly those serving black students — to simply deteriorate in the years since integration occurred. Wealthy districts can supplement state funds with special sales taxes while others barely scrape by, unable to fix dilapidated schools, replace aging technology or bump teachers’ starting salaries above the state average, which ranks 46th in the nation.

Tuesday, March 19, 2019 | 10:15 – 11:15 AM
Pathway to Premier Facilities: Richland Two Bond 2018 Bond Referendum
Carolina A

    1 LU

Speakers:
Will Anderson, Richland School District Two
Libby Roof, Richland School District Two
Harry Miley, Ph.D., Richland School District Two

Facing multiple facilities well past their prime in terms of safety/security and learning environments, Richland Two secured funding for a $468 million capital improvement plan. Members of the Finance, Operations and Communications departments share how their team creatively weathered the changing tides in education, politics and communications. They will share how strategic planning, transparency and lots and lots of communicating help voters understand the needs behind the request to borrow the largest amount ever requested by the district and one of the largest in the state. Walk away from this session with a template for what to do and what not to do the next time your district has to put a bond referendum on the ballot.

Learning Objectives
  • Learn about Long Range Facility Planning
  • Learn how to use Data Analysis
  • Examine the importance of Partner Engagement
  • Understand the importance of excellent Communication

Competency: Educational Facility Pre-Design Planning
Manages a master planning process that combines educational planning, facilities assessment and utilization, demographic research, capital planning and educational specifications with a community-based vision to establish a plan for learning environments. This includes the ability to translate existing or aspirational instructional models to specific programming and spatial relationships.

Domain: Process
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

The Use of Drones in Facilities and Capital Programs
Carolina B

    1 LU

Speaker:
Robert “BJ” Sturman, Charleston County School District

Participants will learn the benefits of using a drone to document the progression of projects. Participants will be able to learn how to use drones to monitor their construction process, create district policies on student and adult usage and how to keep stakeholders informed using this technology.

Learning Objectives
  • Participants will learn standard operating procedures for drones
  • Participants will learn how to create district policies for drone usage
  • Participants will learn a format to document progress of projects
  • Participants will learn how to keep stakeholders informed using this technology

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Toolbox
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

Using Institutional Data for Facility Planning
Pinkney

    1 LU

Speaker:
Jennifer Baez, Charleston County School District

In this session, participants will learn different types of data points which can be and should be used when planning for learning environments. Capacity vs programming and master planning. Participants will be able to learn what kinds of data points are needed to evaluate renovation needs and new building construction. Using these data points, the participant will be able to maximize instructional settings for students by supporting instruction.

Learning Objectives
  • Participants will be able to learn what kinds of data points are needed to evaluate renovation needs and new building construction
  • Participants will learn the difference between program and student capacity
  • Participants will learn how programming impacts renovations and new building construction
  • Participants will learn how data can impact capital master planning

Competency: Assessment of the School Facility
The ability to objectively evaluate a learning environment post-occupancy and utilize that data to improve future projects. Implements a plan for educational commissioning that provides guidance on how to use and maximize the learning environment to meet the foundational vision established in the planning phase.

Domain: Toolbox
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

Tuesday, March 19, 2019 | 11:15 AM – 12:15 PM
Casa Maison: A Charrette-based Approach to Flexible Learning Environments at Cherry Park ES of Language Immersion and Sullivan Middle School
Carolina A

    1 LU

Speakers:
Anthony Cox, Rock Hill School District, York 3
Jimmy Wilhide, AIA, REFP, LEED BD+C, Moseley Architects

View presentation »

The Cherry Park ES of Language Immersion on the Sullivan Middle School campus began as the district’s primary improvement initiative for the School Of Choice Program, and architecturally as an opportunity to combine 3 existing Language Immersion Elementary School programs onto an existing Middle School campus, with renovations to enable Language Immersion to expand into the middle grades. An extensive 2 day + charrette process including Language Immersion parents, teachers, administrators, District Office personnel and Architects (Charrette Team) convened with the task of:
  • Identifying the issues of the Language Immersion Program
  • Prioritizing those issues
  • Creating a defined vision statement for the Language Immersion Program moving forward
  • Analyzing the building concepts of where and how the new combined Language Immersion Elementary School could be located on and with the Sullivan Middle School
  • Analyzing program, cost and schedule scenarios
  • Identifying viable options
  • Selecting the best option
  • Documenting entire process

A detailed discussion of the charrette, the results and the case study of the building design will be presented. Additional topics of discussion will include: the Security and LEED strategies implemented at the new Cherry Park Elementary School.

Topics to be discussed as part of the workshop: Building Design, LEED Project – energy efficiency & sustainable design, Interior Design, Life safety systems, Renovation and Adaptive Re-use, Security as part of building design, site design.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe a charrette process that engages and empowers all stakeholders to quickly identify and prioritize critical issues of an opportunity, documenting the process, and culminating with a mission statement for the opportunity moving forward.
  • Define strategies for flexible learning environments
  • Case Study: Cherry Park ES K-3rd Grade addition, 4th- 8th Grade Renovation, on the campus of the Sullivan Middle School, forming a LEED K-8 Language Immersion Campus
  • Flexible Learning Environments and Security: Identify how these two ideas merge at the Cherry Park ES School of Language Immersion

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Context
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

Ahead of the Tide: Federal Schools Leading the Way to 21st Century Learning Environments
Carolina B

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers:
Laura McLeod, LS3P
Scott Sampson, LS3P

View presentation »

Learning can happen in many different ways and in many different environments, so how do we design spaces that will help students be successful and excel not just in today’s world but in tomorrow’s as well? That was one of the questions that DoDEA asked as they set out to provide world-class educational spaces and opportunities for their students. DoDEA (the Department of Defense Education Activity) is the agency that operates K-12 schools for the Department of Defense in areas throughout the world. As many of their aging schools were in need of replacement, DoDEA transformed their Ed Specs through a collaborative process to be student centered, flexible, and sustainable.

We will explore the collaborative process and transformation of learning spaces for the 21st Century, and some of the lessons learned, through a case study of a school.

Learning Objectives
  • The collaborative process to transform teaching, learning, and school design
  • How the building provides flexible, student centered learning spaces that can respond to various learning styles
  • How daylighting and acoustics are addressed through design to aid in student learning
  • Teaching tools throughout the building that promotes creativity, curiosity, and sustainability

Competency: Educational Visioning
Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to Educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Building Renovations and High-Level Scope of Work
Pinkney

    1 LU

Speaker:
Jennifer Baez, Charleston County School District

In this session, you will learn how to create a high-level scope of work which includes a business case to support capital improvement projects. This resource can be used to present to the school board and to support the creation of a capital building program.

Learning Objectives
  • Participants will be able to create a high-level scope
  • Participants will learn how to create a business case need for their projects
  • Participants will learn how to use a traceability Matrix to identify the needs of a building
  • The participants will learn how to present this information to the school board or other stakeholders

Competency: Educational Facility Implementation, Project Management/Project Delivery
Has a working understanding of how the following areas impact the facility program: regulations and policies; project delivery methodologies; scheduling; preventative maintenance; life-cycle planning; and systems commissioning.

Domain: Toolbox
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019 | 8:30 – 9:30 AM
Roofs: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly
Carolina A

    1 LU

Speakers:
Ray Ramos, Raymond Engineering
Lynne Beaman, Catalyst Communications

As a service to our customers, Raymond Engineering provides an AIA accredited course on effective maintenance of your existing facility assets, specifically addressing roof systems. This one hour course is presented in a Lunch & Learn format w/time for Q&A and general discussion.

Learning Objectives
  • Understand roofing warranties and guarantees, their limits, and owner responsibilities.
  • Learn the advantages and disadvantages of asset management systems that track roofing assemblies.
  • Understand the methods available to building owners that will assist in improved roofing maintenance.
  • Understand the design, construction and maintenance issues that affect long-term roof performance.

Competency: Assessment of the School Facility
The ability to objectively evaluate a learning environment post-occupancy and utilize that data to improve future projects. Implements a plan for educational commissioning that provides guidance on how to use and maximize the learning environment to meet the foundational vision established in the planning phase.

Domain: Toolbox
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

21st Century School Site Planning
Carolina B

    1 LU

Speakers:
Brian Crutchfield, Timmons Group
Sara Snavely, Timmons Group

View presentation »

This presentation will focus on trends related to 21st Century School Site Planning. We will review examples of how site design can help enhance new education goals by incorporating multi-purpose spaces, project and team-based educational areas, incorporation of technology, and outdoor learning spaces. Discussion will revolve around how to seamlessly blend interior and exterior spaces to meet teaching objectives and create learning opportunities outside of a typical classroom setting.

Learning Objectives
  • Gain a better understanding of 21st Century School site design objectives, bringing overall improvement to future learning spaces
  • Learn site layout techniques to create more flexible and efficient school sites
  • Learn how to seamlessly blend interior and exterior education spaces for more appealing/engaging environment for teachers and students
  • Review and discuss case studies and project examples related to 21st Century School site design

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Process
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

The Changing Architecture of Education
Pinkney

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers:
James CC Rice, AIA, LEED AP, Firstfloor
David Cupolo, Ed.S., St. James Intermediate School

View presentation »

How can educational facilities spark curiosity, imagination, creativity, and discovery in today’s student? What educational frameworks for 21st-century learning need to be in place for educators and students be successful? Learn about how evolving teaching methodologies have fostered changes to educational architecture that create an active way for students to learn.

In this presentation, we will discuss how pedagogy and architecture go hand-in-hand with respect to, curiosity, imagination, creativity and discovery and student-centered learning environments.
    Curiosity: How has teaching methodology changed as a result of the needs of today’s students? Are the buildings designed to support new flexible techniques to teach and communicate with each individual learner?
    Imagination: Are we preparing our students to be the adults of tomorrow? Do the open spaces desired in a student-centered learning environment spark imagination?
    Creativity: Teachers are teaching differently and adapting to student’s individual needs with personalized learning experiences. How do changes to traditional classroom environments meet this need?
    Discovery: Educators and students are discovering how to learn and adapt in a student-centered learning environment. How can teachers teach while allowing students to be mobile about the classroom and adjusting the way they want or need to learn? How can a school building really act as a learning tool?

CASE STUDY: In this session, attendees will hear about five new energy-positive facilities in the Horry County School District and gain an understanding of how the architecture of the new facilities supports the District’s educational goals. School Board and District staff wanted buildings that supported their curriculum and aligned with their teaching pedagogy. The planning process for these projects included conversations with the school system about organizational strategies for cohorts of students which nurture freedom and responsibility within a safe, controlled setting. The resulting design incorporates flexibility and freedom with greater visibility, access to technology, occupant comfort and choice of learning area.

The design/build team needed to provide effective spaces for teaching and learning that were safe and healthy. The design was driven by the district’s desire to provide a student-centered teaching and learning environment. Efficient space utilization presented the opportunity to create energy-positive buildings with minimal cost increase. These five new schools are designed to produce 10% more energy than they consume and showcase a variety of high-performance building features. Learning environments that transcend a collection of classrooms were created.

Integrating contemporary learning with energy positive design, community-centric culture, and differentiated instruction, these five new schools champion the idea that learning is important, the importance of stewardship at a community level, and ultimately, raising the community’s expectations of the role a school can play in their children’s lives.

Learning Objectives
  • Learn what the Knowledge, Skillsets, and Life and Career Characteristics of a 21st Century Graduate are.
  • Learn how architectural design has evolved to support the student-centered learning environments of today.
  • Learn about a variety of environmentally responsible design strategies and how they can be included in your next building project.
  • Attendees will walk away with knowledge of how new teaching methodologies coupled with responsive architecture support the required goals of a SC 21st Century Graduate

Competency: Educational Visioning
Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to Educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019 | 9:30 – 10:30 AM
Changing the Learning Culture One Media Center At A Time
Carolina A

    1 LU

Speakers:
Carol Crutchfield, Beaufort County School District – Facilities Planning
Ryan Copeland, Battery Creek High School
Michelle Smyth, McMillan, Pazdan, Smith

View presentation »

With a young energetic media specialist in place, Battery Creek High School’s media center transformation started long before the actual physical renovation in 2017. Inspired by a video he found from 1993 that showed little had changed since that time, this media specialist was the spark for district-wide plans for media center renovations. His persistence led the Facilities Department to work with Instructional Staff to develop standards for future media centers. With a guide in hand, 3 media centers were chosen to kick start the renovations.

Media Center renovations should be more than changing the look of the environment. The timing was right for change. The 2017-18 school year started off with a new principal, a progressive media specialist, and a new media center. These changes sparked a change in culture at a high school with declining enrollments and average academic performance. We will share our experiences on changing from library to media center to learning hub.

Learning Objectives
  • Share Ideas about changing a from “library” to “media center” to “learning hub”
  • Engage participants in ideas about flexible media center spaces using a room within a room concept
  • Encourage participants to reach out to media specialists for guidance and inspiration for transforming learning spaces
  • Creating a mindset beyond “21st Century Learning”

Competency: Educational Visioning
Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to Educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Domain: Context
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

Supporting School District’s Career Development Programs: Ideas from the AEC Industry
Carolina B

    1 LU

Speakers:
Hayley Bowers, M.B. Kahn Construction
Joel Carter, AIA, Jumper Carter Sease Architects
Chuck Saylors, REFP, M.B. Kahn Construction

View presentation »

See some great ideas and examples of career day events for students. South Carolina Schools have placed increasing importance on Career Path Development. Even our elementary school students are exploring their futures through class speakers and Career Days.

As a professional, you will likely be asked to exhibit or speak at an event. Be prepared with some simple and fun ways to engage students, support our public schools, and advance the AEC industry workforce.

Learning Objectives
  • The importance of career development programs for SC Schools
  • How collaborative spaces are being used for Career Day
  • Ideas for Career Day activities from the AEC industry
  • How to teach for a day – a teacher's perspective

Competency: Ethics/Professionalism
Provides leadership and stewardship for the responsible investment of public and private funding into school facilities – while being a known advocate for the importance of the learning environment on a child’s future. They lead and have a record of leading transparent processes that help communities find common ground in developing solutions to complex and sensitive issues – advocating for long term solutions that address the needs of all children and stakeholders including underserved groups.

Domain: Parameters
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the aspects and guidelines of a project often regulated or administered by other entities, organizations, and/or governing agencies.

Brown is the New Green: The Prats, Pitfalls and Benefits of Building Schools on Brownfield Sites
Pinkney

    1 LU/HSW

Speaker:
Christine Hilt, CLH Design, P.A.

View presentation »

As the sale price, development costs and scarcity of greenfield sites becomes more and more of an issue for school systems, there is another option. The industrial site down the street is available. There's only one caveat. The list of environmental issues is a mile long.

This session will explore the pros and cons of brownfield adaptive reuse from the cost of clean up to the public perception of health risks to students. We will look at the impacts placing a school in an industrial area has on its neighbors, zoning and land use and what programs are most likely to succeed in this setting.

We will look at four case studies: An inner city middle school which was awarded the first EPA Smart Growth Award for Schools in the Nation, a middle school and an advanced career center in adapted industrial buildings and an athletic complex and stadium on a 1930's demolished brownfield factory site.

We will also discuss useful site selection criterium and the site investigations that help in choosing the right site … with the goal of proving that sometimes "going green" means choosing brown. Adaptive reuse and brownfield development sites require added scrutiny to maintain public HSW. This session will discuss the added vigilance that is required in the site selection process to maintain public HSW.

Learning Objectives
  • Learn best practices in brownfield development
  • Acquire new knowledge on brownfield development
  • Built upon existing knowledge of brownfield development
  • Think creatively and develop new ideas about adaptive reuse and brownfield development

Competency: Educational Visioning
Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to Educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Domain: Process
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

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