Sessions

Winds of Change April 26-28, 2020
Winds of Change
Asheville, North Carolina

Monday, April 27, 2020 | 10:45 am – 11:45 am
Academy to Envision Tomorrow's Schools – The Teacher's Voice
Swannanoa

Speakers:
Stewart Roberson, President, Moseley Architects
Freebird McKinney, 2018-19 Burroughs Wellcome Fund NC Teacher of the Year, Alamance-Burlington School System
Lisa Godwin, 2017-18 Burroughs Wellcome Fund NC Teacher of the Year

    1 LU

The Academy to Envision Tomorrow’s Schools was comprised of the thirteen North Carolina Regional Teachers of the Year (“Fellows”) from 2017 and 2018. The purpose of the Academy was to elicit Fellows’ views about school design features that will most effectively meet students’ needs in tomorrow’s schools. The Academy included a design workshop and research review. The resulting design themes are valuable to those who provide guidance about school facilities’ elements affecting learning and teaching. The Academy was sponsored by Moseley Architects, PowerUp EDU, CEF Inc., & Meeks Professional Services and was supported by the NC School Superintendents Association.

Learning Objectives
  • Understanding the purpose of the Academy and why effective school design is important based on research
  • Overview of the Process taken to gather the Fellow's feedback
  • Hear the Academy Participants "Take Aways"
  • Hear the Designers and Sponsors "Take Aways"

ALEP Core Competencies

Community Engagement: Leads the internal and external communities through a discovery process that articulates and communicates a community-based foundational vision, forming the basis of a plan for the design of the learning environment. The vision is achieved through a combination of rigorous research, group facilitation, strategic conversations, qualitative and quantitative surveys and workshops. Demonstrates the skill to resolve stakeholder issues while embedding a community's unique vision into the vision for its schools.

Context: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

Learning at Every Turn: Activating the School Footprint from Corner to Corner
Alexander

Speakers:
Alicia Kirwan, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, Skinner Farlow Kirwan Architecture
Brad Farlow, AIA, LEED AP, NCARB, Principal, Skinner Farlow Kirwan Architecture

    1 HSW

Modern K-12 design makes use of the complete building footprint to support active 21st century education. This session will discuss the ways in which historically passive and static spaces can be redesigned or reinterpreted as active learning space. By maximizing the flexibility of these underutilized spaces, designers create opportunities to respond to diverse student and pedagogical needs. As we provide unique spaces, thoughtful K-12 design can connect students and teachers to unique educational opportunities, as well as assist in positive learning outcomes for all students.

This topic centers design thoughtfully considered to improve the experiences of students with diverse needs and heightened sensory response. By empowering educators through the use of flexible, historically underutilized spaces, designers can improve learning outcomes and support diversity in teaching and learning opportunities.

Learning Objectives
  • Discover numerous ways to achieve flexibility, increase utilization and maximize value of historically underutilized spaces within owner budgets.
  • Demonstrate ways in which improvements to design standards can support students with heightened sensory response or other developmental needs.
  • Showcase diverse teaching and learning opportunities provided in underutilized spaces to respond to diverse pedagogical needs.
  • Define opportunities to maximize the use of historically underutilized spaces and respond to diverse teaching and learning styles.

ALEP Core Competencies

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Learning: Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Aligning Budgets with Energy Conservation Goals
Victoria

Speaker:
Renee Hutcheson, FAIA, LEED AP, Project Manager, Willdan

    1 HSW

Identifying energy efficiency strategies while balancing real-world constraints such as budget can be challenging. This interactive session demonstrates how energy-efficiency goals—when addressed beginning in schematic design—can be successfully achieved, saving valuable resources such as design time and client budgets. The session begins with an overview of how comparative analysis assists in achieving energy conservation goals alongside factors that drive energy use. A case study building forming the basis of the charrette will be presented, including an overview of conservation strategies available for consideration. Participants will then break out into small groups and assemble “bundles” of selected energy efficiency measures to play out what-if scenarios, discussing the merits and challenges of each bundle. Facilitators will run live energy modeling simulations to show the results of each team’s bundle. Results of permutations of the charrette will be revealed alongside energy-savings trends, dispelling common misconceptions about the link between budget and energy savings. Performance of the built case study building will also be reviewed.

This session will be dedicated to energy efficiency, which qualifies for HSW.

Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the value early energy analysis provides to the design process and stakeholder decision-making
  • Identify a range of energy-efficiency options and their impacts on energy outcomes during various stages of design
  • Interpret building performance and financial information provided by energy analysis results, including lifecycle costs
  • Understand how decisions made very early in design can increase energy savings opportunities

ALEP Core Competencies

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Toolbox: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

Monday, April 27, 2020 | 2:15 – 3:15 pm
Jones County Journey to Success: Pedagogy Propelling Places
Swannanoa

Speakers:
Dr. Michael Bracy, District Superintendent, Jones County, North Carolina School District
Jill Allshouse, ALEP, Certified Instructional Designer, MeTEOR Education

    1 LU

Hear from Jones County district leaders as to how the vision for teaching and learning served as the catalyst for "breaking the mold" as they designed their new state-of-the-art campus in their rural community. Providing active learning experiences rich with technology, collaboration and flexibility was critical to creating the synergy needed between the environment and the pedagogy to prepare all learners to be future ready. Leaders will share their challenges and successes throughout their journey on transforming education to humanize the system.

Learning Objectives
  • Provide real world insight into the journey a school district took to create Future Ready Learning Spaces
  • Learn how the granular elements of the Vision for Teaching and Learning led to environment design
  • Learn how a strategic plan for environment support with educators led to successfully shifting mindset
  • Learn how the collaboration between district leaders, educators, architects and designers led to thoughtful design to support teaching and learning for all learners

ALEP Core Competencies

Educational Visioning: Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Learning: Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Droning On About Drones
Alexander

Speakers:
Ray Ramos, PE, President, Raymond Engineering
Lynne Beaman, Catalyst Communications

    1 LU

As a service to our customers, Raymond Engineering provides an AIA accredited course on the history of drones and how new technology is being deployed today for building envelope inspections. This one hour course is presented in a Lunch Learn format w/time for Q&A and general discussion. During this course, Raymond Engineering will cover the objectives below.

Learning Objectives
  • Understanding how drones got their start and have evolved over time.
  • Overview of the types of drones and uses.
  • Use and operations issues and how to resolve them.
  • To perform a drone demonstration in order to showcase its capabilities.

ALEP Core Competencies

Assessment of the School Facility: The ability to objectively evaluate a learning environment post-occupancy and utilize that data to improve future projects. Implements a plan for educational commissioning that provides guidance on how to use and maximize the learning environment to meet the foundational vision established in the planning phase.

Learning: Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Cracking the Code: Innovating with a Non-Innovative Ecosystem to get to Immersive Learning Environments and Zero Energy
Victoria

Speakers:
Tomas Jimenez-Eliaeson, AIA, LEED AP, Partner & Design Principal, Little Diversified Architectural Consulting, Inc.
Mike Meechin, Principal, NeoCity Academy, School District of Osceola County
Philip Donovan, AIA, LEED AP, Community Studio Principal, Little Diversified Architectural Consulting, Inc.

    1 HSW

We all face this challenge: We want to innovate but face a ‘system’ that hinders every opportunity to create an Innovative Learning Process, with innovative learning environments, and with innovative implementations. School leadership tend to be risked-averse and believe that 21st century learning can happen in a typical classroom, Ed-Specs do not reflect 21st century learning environment needs, and project budgets do not look at life-cycle costs, even though schools are designed to last 50-75 years, and yet, how can we crack the code? Enter: NEOCITY Academy, a new, 500-student, public Immersive Learningscape STEM high school and First Net-Zero-Energy School in Florida, located on the NEOCITY Campus in Osceola County. This presentation will tell the story of how a partnership between Key District Leadership, a forward-thinking Principal, and an ambitious Design Team, provided a Learning experience grounded in 3 key ideas: Create an Immersive Learning Environment designed to support an alternative learning process amid a rigid EdSpec, A Zero-Energy Building that supports a STEM culture of innovation within a strict budget, and a partnership with The University of Central Florida’s College of Education and NEOCITY industry businesses to support the Florida High Tech’s needs with students that practice innovation and work on 21st century skills daily. NEOCITY is a new urbanist development at the epicenter of a boom in the high-tech, advanced manufacturing industry that central Florida is currently experiencing. This rapid growth coupled with the sunshine state’s easement of regulation on solar energy production has created opportunities for the creation of new, high-performance, zero-energy facilities to educate and train the next generation workforce. The core stakeholder design team was given a mandate to design the new public high school within the state mandated budget and space requirements. NEOCITY Academy has been developed as a twenty-first century, Immersive Learningscape, STEM-focused school that will offer students 3 curriculum paths: Advanced Engineering, Biomedical, and Cyber Security. The facility will be designed to use 70% less energy than a typical public school in Osceola County. The project is located in the heart of a new advanced manufacturing corridor within the NEOCITY Masterplan and the school district of Osceola County has formed a partnership with University of Central Florida to evaluate STEM pedagogy for the creation of a national instruction model. The schools high-performance design and ultra-low energy use will save an anticipated $115,000 per year on energy costs and is expected to save almost $2.7 million over 20 years in life cycle costs compared to a typical district school. Utilizing standard tilt-wall construction with high-performance detailing, a distributed heat-pump system and a 202kw, roof-top mounted PV array, the facility can now be a designated prototype for other school districts throughout the state. This innovative new school will be a key teaching tool in support of the development and execution of its high-tech curriculum.

We will discuss how NEOCITY Academy was designed following the concept of the Immersive Learningscape, where Brain-based lessons about learning, Wellness, and features of Inclusive Design are key ideas behind the concept. We will discuss best practices for reducing the EUI in new buildings in Hot and High Humidity Environments and how to get to Zero Energy. The presentation will go in detail about technical, financial, and the decision-making process for getting to Zero Energy.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the process and details by which the Partnership of District Leaders, School Principal and Design Team underwent to Innovate within a rigid non-innovative educational system.
  • Define the ways in which 21st century, Immersive Learning environments, based on concepts of Brain-Based Learning, Wellness, and Inclusiveness. support and enhance a high-tech, advanced manufacturing STEM high school curriculum.
  • Describe the ways in which reducing the energy use of the building also focuses on improving cognitive function and the health and well-being of the building occupants.
  • Demonstrate 5 key ways in which a public school can reduce its energy use low enough so that a renewable energy source can be added within the project budget including strategies of high-performance envelope detailing for tilt-wall and precast building. typologies

ALEP Core Competencies

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Context: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

Monday, April 27, 2020 | 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Measure Twice, Build Once: A Guide to Facility Master Planning
Swannanoa

Speakers:
Emily Kite, AIA, Principal, Novus Architects
Dr. John Bryant, Associate Superintendent for Administrative Services, Henderson County Public Schools
Timothy Lewis, Asheville Office Director, Harper General Contractors

    1 LU

Join Novus Architects, Henderson County Public Schools and Harper General Contractors as we explore facility assessments and master plans. We will use the recently completed assessment and master plan of Henderson County Public Schools as we breakdown how a district can define their goals, methodology, approach and process. We will also explain how to implement your methodology, sharing examples from the HCPS assessment, as well as next steps including: how does a district use the information, how to communicate with stakeholders, funding partners, organizational leadership, and implement the master plan.

Learning Objectives
  • How to define the goals of your facility’s master plan.
  • Understand different assessments/master planning methodologies and approaches.
  • How implement the methodology that fits your districts goals.
  • Next steps: How does the district use this information, communicate with stakeholders, funding partners, and/or organizational leadership and implement the master plan.

ALEP Core Competencies

Educational Facility Pre-Design Planning: Manages a master planning process that combines educational planning, facilities assessment and utilization, demographic research, capital planning and educational specifications with a community-based vision to establish a plan for learning environments. This includes the ability to translate existing or aspirational instructional models to specific programming and spatial relationships.

Process: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

Resilient Net-Zero Energy Efficient Schools in the 21st Century
Alexander

Speaker:
Frank Gordon, AIA, Senior Director of Building Innovations, National Ready Mixed Concrete Association

    1 HSW

A case study for strong, resilient educational structures that are also either Net -Zero or Net-Zero Capable. This will reference both potential and existing projects that are storm/disaster resistant and have the capability of using less energy than they produce. Some of the specific topics to be discussed are as follows: ICF (Insulated Concrete Forms), Solar Energy, Geothermal Energy/Heat Pumps, L.E.D. lighting packages, and Energy Management Strategies. Topic encompasses safety and resiliency of ICF concrete construction. Including: sustainability, building design, wall systems, energy efficiency.

Learning Objectives
  • To understand ICFs participation in Net Zero Energy Efficient Buildings
  • To understand the role ICFs can perform in Educational Construction design solutions
  • To understand the Life Safety Code advantages and resiliency of using ICFs
  • To understand the advantages of using ICFs in Resilient/Strong Construction

ALEP Core Competencies

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Context: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

21st Century Urban High School: Learning Institution As A Community Resource
Victoria

Speakers:
Becky Brady, AIA, CDT, LEED AP BD+C, Architect, Clark Nexsen
Albert McDonald, Architect, Clark Nexsen
Donna Francis, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Architect, Clark Nexsen

    1 LU

As populations in urban centers continue to grow, progressive educational leaders are exploring sustainable development and evolving community needs. In this course, we highlight project entries from a competition studying a 21st Century Urban High School. Participants were asked to design a multi-functional high school building where shared amenities are a community resource. The designs challenge current trends in educational design, incorporate an affordable housing component, and investigate community integration and potentially untapped partnerships. Through this ideas-based competition, participants sought to identify design solutions that allow schools to engage their community without compromising the safety of the educational environment.

Learning Objectives
  • Participants will challenge current thoughts in high school design.
  • Participants will investigate community integration through multi-use strategies.
  • Participants will identify linkages yet untapped between schools and neighborhoods.
  • Participants will identify strategies that can be implemented to ensure a safe learning environment while allowing for neighborhood access and permeability.

ALEP Core Competencies

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Process: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

Tuesday, April 28, 2020 | 9:00 – 10:30 am
Group Session: Canyon View High School Presentation
Grand Ballroom

Speakers:
Jason Lembke, AIA, Architect, Principal, DLR Group
Taryn Kinney, AIA, Organizational Psychologist and Architect, DLR Group
Phillip Nowlin, Principal, Canyon View High School, Agua Fria Union High School District 216
Jade (last name withheld), Student, Canyon View High School

    1.5 LU

In 2015, Agua Fria Union High School District began it's journey towards a new high school facility to support an increasing enrollment. With a legacy of historical innovation, they sought to develop a next generation high school solution that would catapult them towards a future vision of what High School could be in their community and beyond. During this session we'll present the planning, programming and design process, as well as ongoing research initiatives, of this award winning project. A MacConnell winning project begins with the right blend of planning, design, and stakeholder input, and ends with an innovative design that facilitates student achievement galvanizing a strong vision. While this designation is elevated in stature, every school district has the ability, and responsibility, to positively impact their learning environments in support of their vision for teaching and learning. Participants will hear steps this year’s MacConnell winning firm took during the planning and design of Canyon View High School, and how an empathetic, data driven process can be applied in their home districts. From learning real life lessons to shaping the culture of a new campus, one sophomore at Canyon View High School will also share her personal journey inside the school.

Educators and learners deserve the best environment to try new experiences, build skills, and contribute to their communities. Schools work hard to change from outdated approaches toward learner-centric education that support these experiences, however, 70 percent of change efforts fail. What does it take to create and sustain a new culture? Through decades of working with school systems, we identified a disconnect between district academic vision, facilities, and campus implementation. Founded in research completed at Columbia University’s Teachers College, our solution bridges organization, learning, and design (BOLD) to ensure every educator and learner find fulfillment. Participants will hear lessons learned from school districts that have implemented change successfully and will leave with research-based techniques to guide transitions at their home district.

Learning Objectives
  • Learn how stakeholder engagement laid the foundation for long term success.
  • Understand how data allowed the district to make decisions quickly and with confidence.
  • Learn about how a new approach to sustainability allowed for programmatic innovation.
  • Understand how a continual culture of change is being fostered by administration, teachers and students
  • Understand how the role of consistent leadership is critical to any change process.
  • Understand the meaning of Participatory Design and the value it can bring to teacher engagement and in turn student performance.
  • Understand change processes and take-away tools to best implement.
  • Understand how to engage parents, local businesses, students, and teachers around the necessity for continuous change and improvement.
  • Learn how community engagement can spark innovation and deepen understanding.
  • Discover of how data can be leveraged towards programmatic outcomes.
  • Hear how research can be implemented and studied from construction through occupancy and beyond.
  • Understand how a student perspective can be changed through design and culture.

ALEP Core Competencies

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Educational Facility Implementation, Project Management/Project Delivery: Has a working understanding of how the following areas impact the facility program: regulations and policies; project delivery methodologies; scheduling; preventative maintenance; life-cycle planning; and systems commissioning.

Context: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

Toolbox: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

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