Program Sessions / Keynotes

Mission: Possible April 3-5, 2019
Mission: Possible; Planning Great Educational Environments
Wyndham San Antonio Riverwalk
San Antonio, TX

KEYNOTE    Friday, April 5, 2019 | 8:00 – 9:15 AM
Growth Mindset Incubators: A Case Study
Texas B

    1.25 LU

Speakers
Liz Katz
Liz Katz, AIA, Associate
NAC Architecture
Faith Eakin
Faith Eakin, Lead Program Manager
Greater Seattle Bureau of Fearless Ideas (BFI)

Imagine the possibility of literally being transported into a new type of learning environment where there are endless possibilities. Growth Mindset is an idea developed by Stanford researcher Carrol Dweck – opposing the idea of the Fixed Mindset which asserts that people are born with certain characteristics (i.e. - being smart, strong, kind, adventuresome, or not), and they don’t really change. Growth Mindset allows a person to believe in the possibility of changing their pre-conceived characteristics. It allows students to recognize and see through stereotypes. “A growth mindset is the belief that you can develop your abilities through hard work; good strategies; and input, help, and mentoring from others." —Carol Dweck The concept of Growth Mindset is becoming more widely used in education among teachers and students, and is consistently being improved and applied in both educational theory and practice. Challenges exist in transferring the language and strategies taught through a growth-mindset approach to everyday interactions with teachers, parents, and others outside the classroom. How can a child apply Growth Mindset tools in a society that is still full of stereotypes? The Greater Seattle Bureau of Fearless Ideas (BFI), an educational non-profit in Seattle, fosters an environment that gives students the confidence to take Growth Mindset into the real world. They are also striving to bridge this disconnect by building a Growth Mindset environment outside of school that reinforces these core concepts for students, families, and community volunteers, encouraging students to apply Growth Mindset even more broadly. Our presentation will outline the concept of Growth Mindset v. Fixed Mindset and how to overcome what Claude M. Steele calls the Threat of Stereotypes. We will show how Growth Mindset is working in BFI’s after school tutoring program. The audience will hear from the Lead Program Manager at BFI, Faith Eakin, on how they are creating programs that motivate and inspire kids to learn and want to return again and again. The audience will also hear firsthand from a public school student who use what they learn at BFI, at their school and home. They will also share ideas on how Growth mindset could be incorporated into a larger school setting. Liz Katz with NAC Architecture will explore how the design of BFI’s unique learning environment promotes social and emotional learning, and share strategies to create Growth Mindset incubators in both new and existing schools.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the difference between Growth Mindset v. Fixed Mindset
  • Understand how to recognize hidden biases and avoid the Threat of Stereotypes
  • See how both Growth Mindset and Social and Emotional Learning are being used by teachers and students at the Greater Seattle Bureau of Fearless Ideas
  • Understand how Growth Mindset incubators—spaces that support social and emotional learning—can be incorporated in both new and existing schools
Thursday, April 4, 2019 | 10:00 – 11:00 AM
Discover the Possibilities: Continuing the Vision for Allen ISD
Salon 1

    1 LU

Speakers
Brandon Boyter Allen Independent School District
Sangeetha Karthik, AIA, RID, LEED AP BD+C, NCIDQ, Corgan

View presentation »

This session will highlight the comprehensive transformation of Allen ISD’s elementary schools. Despite the constraints of a compressed schedule and detailed phasing within occupied facilities, the result of the team’s efforts exceeded expectations. Engaging and learner focused spaces were created that inspire students, attract quality faculty and welcome the community. Along with illustrating how the schools were reinvented to meet the rigors of a technology-centric teaching and learning environment, this session will highlight the collaboration between the district’s facility managers, administration and principals and the design team, construction manager and community. The result is a cohesive facility that reinforces the vision of the project and meets the needs of a growing community.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn how to optimize opportunities to transform existing facilities
  • Illustrate what affect phased construction can have on design
  • Understand the role of the change management process with building users for an impactful outcome
  • Understand the challenges of renovating an occupied campus
Planning for Storm Shelters
Salon 2

    1 LU

Speaker
Daniel A. Dain, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Stantec Architecture

View presentation »

Designing schools today with recent requirements for storm shelters has brought a number of considerations and concerns when planning great educational environments. School districts will need to consider cost, size, location, and emergency planning, in addition to operations and maintenance. Early planning with the design team will aid in bond planning, programming, and a design that aligns with the vision and goals of the district. This presentation will also dive into code compliance and strategies for determining storm shelter size and location and application of the ICC 500 Standard for Design and Construction of Storm Shelters.

Learning Objectives:
  • Evaluate considerations for storm shelter planning.
  • Interpret storm shelter code requirements for Group E occupancies.
  • Strategies for determining shelter capacity and location.
  • Applying the ICC 500 Standard for Design and Construction of Storm Shelters.
Keeping Pace: How the Next Generation Library can Harness Technology to Advance its Core Purposes
Salon 3

    1 LU

Speakers
Beverly Fornof, Corgan
AJ Saustaita, Corgan

The library has long been defined as an anchor of culture and intellectual exploration. It has been a place of inspiration and learning, where ideas are shared in community. Now, in an age where information is not confined to a place and where social connectivity takes many forms, how does the library not only remain relevant, but evolve and thrive? While continuing to prioritize personal connection and hands-on learning, the strategic integration of technology within a flexible environment assists in strengthening knowledge sharing, ideation, and community for today’s learners.

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide a definition of the library that is beyond simply a media center, that represents its historic ideals of knowledge sharing, ideation, and community
  • Explore the overlay of this definition of the library, with current technologies and the evolved pace and expectations of today’s learners
  • Discuss where the balance of centralized versus dispersed libraries may lie, and how technology can provide continuity throughout the campus
  • Understand how the use of connective technologies, immersive realities and other innovations can be seamlessly incorporated while still prioritizing personal connections
Creating a Security-Minded Culture
Salon 4

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Cassandra McCallister, Fort Worth ISD
Chris Everett, engage2learn
Scott Himelstein, PBK-REDi

View presentation »

How do you design for a security-minded culture? This session shares how Arlington ISD and Fort Worth ISD have created a more safe and secure culture through changing the learning experience and using that as a basis for emotional wellness and collaboration. Quantitative and qualitative data will be shared on how classrooms have become more safe. This session also outlines the 5 steps to creating a campus culture that enhances security through creating a learning framework that includes protocols, cultural tenets that outline a security-minded culture, professional learning that engages all staff in the culture, learning experiences that include student protocols, and recognition and reward systems for culture.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn the 5 steps to create a safe and secure school culture through a learning experience aligned to the students' physical and emotional well-being.
  • Identify a recognition and reward system for measuring and maintaining the safety and security of a school.
  • Consider the impact on school safety and security through examples of quantitative and qualitative data relating to classroom safety.
  • Learn how a locally designed learning framework can serve as the foundation for a safe and secure learning environment.
Improving School Safety, Security & Social Emotional Learning
Salon 5

    1 LU/HSW

Speaker
Dr. Scott Rogers, Tooele County School District

17 year veteran School Superintendent, Dr. Scott Rogers, will present the story of Rose Springs Elementary which has been touted as one of the safest schools in America. He will outline how Tooele County School District used the Utah School Safety Framework and Safety Listening Sessions to address safety and security issues which were common concerns expressed by teachers, support professionals, administrators, school board members, parents, and students. Superintendent Rogers will also highlight the incorporation of high-speed horizontal sliding fireguard doors as a school-hardening and security solution. The district’s efforts to strengthen Social Emotional Learning will also be weaved into the presentation.

The 8 foundational conditions of the Utah School Safety Framework are:
  1. Establishing a positive and supportive school culture
  2. Attending to school-based mental health
  3. Securing the building, grounds, and transportation
  4. Screen, training, and supporting school staff
  5. Mitigating student safe school violations
  6. Providing digital safety measures
  7. Developing community prevention and response partnerships
  8. Using a crisis and emergency response protocol which includes:
    • Natural disasters
    • Emotional distress
    • School violence

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify resources and options for school safety and concerns.
  • Evaluate a case study of how Tooele County School District inacted policies to address school safety.
  • Compare various means and methods for protecting schools.
  • Explain 8 foundational conditions of school safety framework.
Thursday, April 4, 2019 | 11:15 AM – 12:15 PM
Honoring the Past, Inspiring Community and Elevating Talent: Fort Worth ISD’s I.M. Terrell Academy for STEM and VPA
Salon 1

    1 LU

Speakers
Gary Griffith, AIA, LEED AP, Fort Worth ISD
Jason Mellard, AIA, LEED AP, Corgan

Strong schools are embedded in the heritage, values and aspirations of their communities. The architecture of a campus can create a strong sense of place that connects generations. When selecting a site for a proposed arts and STEM academy, Fort Worth ISD saw an opportunity to reinvigorate an underutilized, 1882 school campus which was home to the first black school in the city. The careful renovation of the existing facilities and a modern, state-of-the-art performance hall that both honors and elevates the campus heritage provides space for the academy to achieve its vision of developing and nurturing artistic talent, creative thinkers and innovative problem solvers who will change the global landscape for generations to come.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand how architecture can enhance the connection of current generations of learners to the heritage, values and aspirations of their communities.
  • Discover strategies for renovating and adding on to historic campuses to reflect current community aspirations and Next-Generation learning strategies.
  • Learn how to facilitate community discussions for bond projects that connect past and future generations.
  • Understand the challenges and opportunities provided by developing on an urban site, including city approval processes, construction sequencing and traffic analysis.
Next Generational Design for Today’s Student Athletes
Salon 2

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Patrick Glenn, AIA, REFP, LEED AP Glenn | Partners
Tim McClure, AIA, Northwest ISD
Aaron Ewert, Glenn | Partners

In our fast-paced society, there is a growing focus on next-generational health and wellness for today’s student-athletes. Technology has made planning and tracking our fitness levels a daily, sometimes hourly, ritual. With the explosion of fitness apps, nutritional meal plans and exercise programs, this presentation will focus on how strategic programming complimented with creative building design can produce facilities that play a direct role in a student-athlete’s level of training and performance, on and off the field.

Learning Objectives:
  • Audience will learn various technological levels of health and fitness data tracking.
  • Presentation will cover various trends in athletic training and performance techniques.
  • Audience will see design and building examples of next generational high school athletic facilities.
  • Presentation will cover cost benefits of locating ICC-500 storm shelter within athletic locker rooms.
Societal Benefits of Managing Facility Cost of Ownership
Salon 3

    1 LU

Speaker
Monte Hunter, AIA, Parkhill Smith & Cooper

View presentation »

Learn how managing facility total cost of ownership (TCO) can positively impact society. Preserving funds for education, preserving resources, saving energy, reducing carbon footprints, reducing landfill impact and facility equalization are a few ways TCO management can benefit society. Case studies with proven results will be provided. Attendees will learn how to build an Excel template to manage TCO.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understanding the impact of facility cost of ownership
  • Cost of ownership trends in K12 facilities
  • Equalizing facilities with peer space trends
  • Quantifying the impact of facilities on the environment and operating funds
Developing Dallas ISD's First Long Range Facilities Master Plan
Salon 4

    1 LU

Speakers
Scott Layne, ALEP, Dallas ISD
Irene Nigaglioni, AIA, ALEP, LEED AP BD+C, IN2 Architecture

This presentation will focus on the Long Range Facilities Master Plan for Dallas ISD. The plan, represents Dallas ISD’s first ever plan, and it includes a study into learning, in order to also incorporate a technology plan for the district. The team will present the process, the community engagement and the final outcome, which included a district strategic facilities plan, technology plan, technology assessment, facilities assessment, capacity studies, educational specifications, technical design guidelines and campus master plans.

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will learn the process and components of a Long Range Facilities Master Plan.
  • Participants will learn the criteria for assessing school buildings to determine repair or replacement.
  • Participants will be able to plan and engage in a community engagement process to bring the entire community into the planning process.
  • Participants will gain knowledge of a measurement rubric for school facilities.
Planning the Appropriate Aquatic Facilities for Your School District and Community
Salon 5

    1 LU

Speakers
Lorin Pargoud, PBK
Trey Schneider PE, PBK Sports
Kevin Mckeever, Lamar CISD

View presentation »

There has been a steady growth in students participating in swimming and diving programs every year and have historically increased with the Americans success after every Summer Olympics since 2008. The media and the celebrity status that these athletes have achieved due to the success in swimming and diving has increased the participation of students and children in the community. The girls have lead the way in the participation rate of swimming and diving in the US as recorded by NFHS. The increase of participation has led to an increase construction of Aquatic Facilities to serve the demand in the schools and the community. With the increase demand of aquatic facilities, what is the best way to plan, design, and maintain these specialized and complex facilities? In this session we will look at an Aquatics master plan and collaborations with staff and the community to understand the needs in these type of facilities. Look at design configurations and concepts and how the experience can differ for spectator and athlete as well as the different programs the facility can serve. Review building systems, material and finishes and what works in a corrosive environment. Discuss the challenges of operations and maintenance of these type of facilities.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn to master plan an aquatics program in your district and community.
  • Learn about the appropriate sizes of aquatics and design type complexities.
  • Learn about relative buildings systems, equipment, materials and finishes.
  • Identify challenges in the operations and maintenance of an aquatic facility.
Thursday, April 4, 2019 | 4:15 – 5:15 PM
Safe Schools – Best Practices and Lessons Learned from a Real-World Risk and Vulnerability Assessment
Salon 1

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Tony Chojnowski, RCDD/OSP, RTPM, True North Consulting Group
John Chapman, III, Ed.D., Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD
Mario De La Rosa, Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD

Hear how a leading Texas school district used a risk and vulnerability assessment to identify health, safety, and welfare (HSW) concerns associated with district safety and security. Panelists include the Superintendent of a large urban school district, the district’s Director of Safety and Security, and a leading safety and security expert who assisted the district in strategic decision making designed to positively impact the district’s overall HSW. This case study will use a facilitated discussion approach which allows audience members to engage in Q&A with the panelists.

Learning Objectives:
  • At the end of the session, participants will be able to compose a compelling argument for encouraging district leaders to analyze safety and security risks and vulnerabilities as part of the design process in order to increase support for architectural features intended to limit or prevent injuries and death among users of school facilities.
  • At the end of the session, participants will be able to defend decisions where designs have added safety and security features intended to reduce risk and vulnerabilities and to increase positive emotional responses among users of buildings or sites.
  • At the end of the session, participants will be able to develop a mental catalog of new ideas for designing with student HSW in mind by finding inspiration in the case study discoveries and outcomes.
  • At the end of the session, participants will be able to critique stakeholder's suggestions for possible HSW elements through a risk and vulnerability perspective and will be able to provide suggestions to increase buy-in for incorporating modern HSW elements into designs for current and future projects.
Growing Pains: Community Engagement and the Impact of Unique Pedagogy During Planning and Design Development
Salon 2

    1 LU

Speakers
Sarah Gould, AIA, A4LE, KKT Architects
Emily Hutton, Tulsa Public Schools
Liz Rohrbacker, IIDA, A4LE, KKT Architects

View presentation »

Pedagogy is critical to establishing the programming, planning, and design for any school project. When a pedagogy is unique within its district, additional research, focus groups, and discussions from the outset of design development ensure project priorities are established and all stakeholders’ needs are included. Buy-in of the community, school personnel, and students is crucial to long-term project success. In this presentation, we explore several methodologies related to approaches and timing for engaging community stakeholders as well as integration of stakeholder priorities into project planning. Tulsa Public Schools (TPS) has implemented unique pedagogies for two elementary schools. One is the first public Montessori school in the state. The other is among the few language-immersion schools in the Tulsa area. Both were developed with thoughtful engagement with constituents but in two very different ways. Our presentation will explore methods of community engagement, using these two schools as case studies, and share the lessons we learned through the different approaches. Emerson Montessori, a gut and remodel of an existing building plus an addition, opened in August 2018 in an underserved community in North Tulsa. The architectural team and district worked together to include the community group—a highly-engaged staff, the neighborhood association, and parent groups—in planning the facility. Based on community feedback, TPS decided to phase in the Montessori training for the staff which meant the building planning and design had to work for the district’s traditional standards as well as become the model for the district’s new standards related to Montessori education. The neighborhood group prioritized building aesthetics (to fit within the neighborhood context) as well as the programming and services being offered (including aftercare and other partnerships). Eisenhower International School entailed a full gut and remodel of an existing unoccupied middle school which was repurposed for relocating the established and successful TPS elementary language-immersion magnet program. In addition to the customary programming and planning meetings with the administration and faculty, the design team engaged the highly-invested PTA, first, to address programming, then in the design process to visualize the remodel. For this project, meetings illuminated the differing priorities of the school and the PTA and established areas of tensions needing to be addressed as well as areas of common ground. KKT led the many stakeholders: school staff, School Community, neighborhood groups, and district leaders through a series of design meetings that brought all constituent voices to the table, and resulted in project success. The timing for engagement with stakeholders at both schools provide lessons learned for proactive communications.

Learning Objectives:
  • DISCUSS methods and timing of collaboration with your client (or school district) to IDENTIFY project stakeholders, both internal (teachers, administration, and students) and external (parents, neighborhood association groups, and the general public).
  • EVALUATE and DEVELOP tools to engage effectively with various stakeholders.
  • ABILITY to evaluate the best timing for engaged discussions with community stakeholders during the programming, planning, and interior design of a public school entity.
  • DISCOVER examples of unique programming and planning opportunities that can be inspired by community-engagement stakeholder meetings during the design phase via case study examples.
MISSION IMPOSSIBLE? A 5 Story High School in the Heart of Downtown Houston to Support the Visual and Performing Arts
Salon 3

    1 LU

Speakers
Jorge Huerta, Rice & Gardner Consultants, Inc.
Daniel Bankhead, AIA, NOMA, Houston Independent School District

View presentation »

We’re familiar with the challenges of building a new high school. Well, try building one in Downtown Houston on a land-locked site with a rail line on each side, underground parking, and cooling and heating provided by a third party among other things. It seemed impossible – no one ever anticipated it would be this successful with an early finish and under 5 warranty items. The team will discuss challenges and how they were overcome. It’s a performance worth seeing.

Learning Objectives:
  • Construction Methods: protracted planning and coordination effort that took place in order to keep this school on track to completion.
  • Building Design: Unique building features and the challenges associated with turning design concepts to reality.
  • Site Design: Working with limited land in a high-traffic, downtown area.
  • Acoustics: Design and construction of specialty state-of-the-art acoustic environments for performing and visual arts.
Build A Better Plan! Assess Your Risk, Manage Your Emergency Plan and Analyze Your Life-cycle Cost. An Interactive School Planning Jam Session
Salon 4

    1 LU

Speaker
Andre Lehr, Rice & Gardner
Kapil Upadhyaya, Kirksey Architecture

View presentation »
Prepare your Emergency Plan, Assess Risk & Analyze Life-cycle Cost »

SQUARE FOOT & CONSTRUCTION BUDGET are long outdated metrics in planning school campuses. Life-cycle Cost Analysis has overtaken these metrics over the past few decades to make important planning decisions. School Districts have started measuring Operational Performance with meters, sub-meters and measuring maintenance performance with inventory management software. Program Managers utilize this data to inform new projects using Life-cycle Cost Assessment. New metrics are emerging that prepare a school district for risks– both natural and man-made. This presentation would introduce new metrics based on standards established by American Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The session would divide attendees into groups of 4-8 people and conduct three sequential workshops:
  1. Risk Assessment for School District
    Each group would be given a different situation and asked to assess risk to their school district. Some of these risks may include floods, tornadoes, technological emergency or active shooter. Various data sources and tools would be discussed to conduct a risk assessment.
  2. Emergency Management Plan & New Space Program
    An Emergency Management Plan based on the highest risk to school and a Space Program itemized list of space requirements would be given to each group. Each group would be asked to modify the Space Program based on their risk assessment in step 1 and Emergency Management Plan. For instance, a Gym may be desired for use as an emergency shelter; or special lighting controls may be implemented for temporary close-down procedures.
  3. Estimation of Life-cycle Cost for a School
    An enhanced life-cycle cost assessment method would be discussed that reduces Insurance Costs while increasing value of District’s Bonds. Using the tools provided, each group would estimate the life-cycle cost for their school project. Finally, each group will present Life-cycle Cost of their school and share why they made their choices.

The presentation intends to further reinforce the approach of life-cycle cost analysis that is already being used by school districts. Also, it would highlight the necessary role that third-party program management and assessors play in building new schools.

Learning Objectives:
  • Review various natural and man-made risk elements that apply to school districts and understand what risk assessment means for school districts.
  • Understand the basic tenets of an emergency management plan and how risk assessment informs it.
  • Through interactive exercises, participants would learn how different schools assign costs for space programs, and how life-cycle cost analysis is a more powerful tool instead of first-cost analysis.
  • Learn first-hand how risk assessment done during program development of a school affects life-cycle costs leading to savings for school districts.
Celebrating the Differences! Unique and Unrepeatable Learning Experiences
Salon 5

    1 LU

Speakers
Jessica Molter, AIA, Pfluger Architects
Tom Leonard, Eanes ISD
Trevor Hance, Round Rock Independent School District

Equity and parity are important, but can School Districts leverage what differentiates their campuses and the interests of their educators to provide one-of-a-kind opportunities for students? Unique programs capture the imagination and expand students’ perspectives of the opportunities within their reach. This panel discussion will explore extraordinary programs at Eanes ISD and Round Rock ISD that push the limits and defy the norm.

Learning Objectives:
  • Empowering educators leads to exceptional education. Understand how Round Rock ISD established a program to fund teacher ideas to explore to enhance student opportunity.
  • Real Life Experience. Explore the Westlake Business Incubator program and understand the structure, funding and educational goals of the program
  • Breaking Out of the Mold. Learn how Eanes ISD and Round Rock ISD explored creative solutions to facilities that not only solve unique problems, but provide one of a kind educational spaces..Breaking Out of the Mold. Learn how Eanes ISD and Round Rock IS
  • How do I start? Learn how to target the right programs for your District!
Friday, April 5, 2019 | 9:15 – 10:15 AM
Match Maker: How to Bring Value to Clients Through Relationships and Networking
Salon 1

    1 LU

Speakers
Sarah Gould, AIA, A4LE, KKT Architects
Liz Rohrbacker, IIDA, A4LE, KKT Architects

View presentation »

This session will explore the evolution of firm-led client partnerships in two projects, amplifying the impact for all entities as they serve the community and fulfill their missions. Sand Springs Public Schools & Scott Rice/ Steelcase: As part of academic research conducted through KKT, an intern conducted student and faculty interviews prior to a small school renovation project. Alert to the school’s needs and a local Scott Rice franchise/ retail store’s furnishings availability, KKT orchestrated an outfitting of classrooms with Steelcase furniture. The new furniture affords students and faculty state of the art educational furniture solutions while providing the Scott Rice and Steelcase brands exposure to their products and services. The architecture student is following the renovation with research about how the newly-configured spaces would affect learning, engagement, and student-teacher interaction. KKT’s awareness of the clients’ needs and organizational opportunities benefit the client as well as the vendor and graduate student and the research he will ultimately share to the benefit of students and furniture designers on a greater scale. Funding and staffing frustrations for two clients set in motion a broader opportunity to forge a public/private partnership benefiting both. The Tulsa Children’s Museum was developing plans for their new location in Phase II of Tulsa’s world-class park, A Gathering Place, and needed community partners for funding of their STEM-centric, interactive learning lab. Knowing that our long-time client Tulsa Public Schools was interested in developing a STEM center led to the design team’s recognition of the potential symbiosis and their introducing the parties to one another. It is a perfect fit. The resulting public/private partnership between TPS and the Tulsa Children’s Museum led to the Discovery Lab’s full funding while providing TPS with a needed and exciting STEM classroom venue for students across the district. Discovery Lab will house interactive learning exhibits in its great hall for the public to explore and STEM-centered TPS classrooms on the second floor. And every child in TPS will now experience the benefits of STEM education in a world-class destination as they explore and attend classes at the Discovery Lab.

Learning Objectives:
  • At the end of this course, participants will understand the value architects can bring to their clients by conserving resources.
  • At the end of this course, participants will understand how merging two projects can be the solution.
  • At the end of this course, participants will be able to transform classroom space by reimagining furniture and classroom layout.
  • At the end of this course, participants will learn how to maximize their community relationships to bring value to their clients.
Contrasting Application of District Standards: New Comprehensive vs. New Magnet High School
Salon 2

    1 LU

Speakers
Wendy Heger, AIA, Page
Daniel W. Bankhead, FAIA, Houston Independent School District
Carol J. Mosteit, High School for Law & Justice, Houston ISD

View presentation »

Houston ISD worked with Page, DLR Group, and stakeholders to design replacements for the High School for Law & Justice and North Forest High School. Students entered dramatically new learning environments in 2018. One launches students into law enforcement and criminal justice careers; the other comprehensively serves a disadvantaged community. How do the new campuses impact the students and community?

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will compare and contrast facility design for legal and justice career education versus comprehensive high school education.
  • Participants will learn how design strategies affect the student experience via stories and metrics.
  • Participants will hear from a School Principal who advocated for program-specific design and a District Design Manager who promoted equitable standards.
  • Participants will be exposed to the strategy of two new school projects serving to uplift transitional neighborhoods.
A Quiet Space in a Noisy World: Transforming the Sensory Experience for Diverse Learners
Salon 4

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Lisa Adams, NCIDQ, LEED AP, HKS, Inc.
Ashley Flores, HKS, Inc.

The average day for a student can be chaotic. There’s sensory input from all angles – a mild irritation for neurotypical students but a serious obstacle for students with developmental disabilities. For diverse learners at Lane Tech College Prep in Chicago, a Sensory Wellbeing Hub provides tactile opportunities for students to reset throughout the day. Join us to learn about the research behind the Hub as well as its design and impact on the experience of diverse learners.

Learning Objectives:
  • At the end of this session, participants will be able to identify the unique needs of students with developmental disabilities.
  • At the end of this session, participants will be able to explain how key design principles can improve students’ wellbeing.
  • At the end of this session, participants will be able to describe the design of the Sensory Wellbeing Hub and how each interactive element address a particular student need.
  • At the end of this session, participants will be able to understand and apply the impact of the Hub on students, per findings from a mixed methods research study.
A Whole New School – Case Study of the Development of a New Elementary School Plan for Lamar CISD
Salon 5

    1 LU

Speakers
Kevin McKeever, Lamar CISD
Taylor Alford, AIA, VLK Architects, Inc.
Gloria Barrera, Vanir Construction Management, Inc.

The Lamar CISD included 5 new elementary schools in their 2014 Bond. In this presentation we will illustrate the accelerated collaborative process that resulted in the plan for the new elementary prototype as well as the challenges faced in both the instructional and technical areas and how they were overcome. We will also present the construction results of the first project, post occupancy evaluation and modifications that were made to the next school plan.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the planning and design process and be able to facilitate a design charrette.
  • Understand the quality and cost control process during the design phase and how to implement.
  • Lessons learned during construction phase of new prototype and how to avoid cost impacts.
  • See examples of a post occupancy review and how it benefits the owner.
Friday, April 5, 2019 | 10:30 – 11:30 AM
Working to Get it Right: The ongoing dialogue between industry professionals and educators
Salon 1

    1 LU

Speakers
Sangeetha Karthik, AIA, RID, LEED AP BD+C, NCIDQ Corgan
Scott Layne, Dallas Independent School District

View presentation »

To the degree educators look to industry to inform course offerings and student development, Corporate America is referencing successful schools to gauge the demands of the next-generation of innovators. A constant connection to the next-generation is held by schools and desired by industry. Regarding environmental design, industry professionals are seeking to craft spaces that will attract and retain young workers. Schools are familiar with a student’s desire for autonomy – to choose how and at what pace they learn and solve problems. As educational environments are appropriately shaped by this, industry will take notice. Join us as we explore where both educators and industry are getting it right and where we will be headed next.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the overlapping relationship today’s educators and industry professionals should and do have.
  • Gain best practices from both education and corporate design.
  • Discuss what today’s first graders will expect when they are first year college students and the first of a new generation of professionals.
  • Be inspired to be more attentive to who today’s students are and who they will become.
Campus Safety Top Ten List – Panel Discussion
Salon 2

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Sean Connor, Pfluger
Russell Bundy, Leander ISD
Kirby Warnke, Corpus Christi ISD

View presentation »

A review of practical steps that schools can take right now to improve the safety of existing school buildings. Nothing experimental, just a concise explanation of safety improvements, typical costs, practical considerations, and supporting data. This will be a panel discussion, moderated by an architect but primarily presented by experienced school district Security and Police personnel.

Learning Objectives:
  • Most cost-effective basic building security features
  • Building layout issues related to emergency situations
  • Law Enforcement perspective vs. Campus Management
  • Beyond Security; other campus emergency and safety issues
Performing Space Strategies for Contrary Ideologies
Salon 4

    1 LU

Speakers
Greg Estes, RA, Glenn | Partners
Aaron Ewert, Glenn | Partners
Fritz Schwentker, ASTC, WJHW (Wrighton | Johnson | Haddon | Williams)

The relevance of Performing and Fine Arts programs have become a growing and strategic part of next-generational education and curriculum. With the demand to build more with less dollars, this presentation will cover various programmatic topics and design trends relating to larger, traditional theaters compared to smaller, more multi-dimensional performance spaces while separately focusing on more detailed technical aspects through two very different project case studies.

Learning Objectives:
  • The presentation will cover trends in theatrical design.
  • The audience will learn technical components of theater design.
  • Presenters will show integrated education and program flexibility design approaches.
  • The presentation will cover planning strategies for multi-purpose spaces.
Learning from Experience – The value of Post Occupancy Evaluations
Salon 5

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Shivani Langer, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP Stantec
Cristy Bickel, AIA, LEED AP, Stantec
Zac Morton, PE, LEED AP, DBR Engineering Consultants, Inc.

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In the last few decades, huge strides have been made in the industry towards energy efficiency and towards incorporating sustainability measures in buildings. Many green building rating systems have also been paving the way for higher building performance. In recent years though, rating systems like LEED v4 and the WELL Building Standard are including requirements for post occupancy surveys and they are asking project teams to re-certify projects after a few years to ensure buildings are performing as designed and are meeting user comfort needs after occupancy. In Stantec’s Sustainability Research and Benchmarking program we have led post occupancy research in many school buildings over the last 7 years. The studies include both quantitative and qualitative analysis of how a building is performing after occupancy. Post Occupancy data collection and analysis includes:
  • User (teachers, maintenance and administration staff) Indoor Environmental Quality comfort survey with questions relating to acoustics, lighting, thermal comfort among other building characteristics
  • Collection of water and energy utility bills from year/s of occupancy
  • Client and design team interviews and discussions
  • Design and construction document drawing and specification reviews
  • Predictive tool analysis

This presentation will discuss user satisfaction and utilities data gathered from at least four Middle Schools in Texas. The user satisfaction study was completely unbiased and conducted via a third party (Center for the Built Environment – University of Berkeley) Indoor Environmental Quality survey, which allowed us to determine our buildings' performance in relation to other worldwide school buildings in their database. This study is not about what works in concept, it gives us lessons learned and proof of the successful or not so successful design strategies. The study will discuss user health and wellbeing as defined by the WELL Building Standard and how it further emphasizes the need for post occupancy evaluations (POEs). Through this study, we hope to be able to encourage the use of POEs and inform future design decisions made by clients, the designers and by the industry.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand what a Post Occupancy Evaluation Study includes, who is involved and its process.
  • Understand how new standards like the WELL Building Standard are concentrating on human experience, health and wellbeing – and how post occupancy evaluations are key in achieving these goals successfully.
  • Understand what approaches and strategies towards high performing buildings are successful in creating efficient and healthy environments.
  • Identify lessons learned and future research needs through this study that can inform school building design.
Friday, April 5, 2019 | 12:45 PM – DURING TOUR AT SCHOOL
How to Fit a Square Peg in a Round Hole. Holmes High School Fine Arts Replacement Building
    4 LU

Speakers
Leroy San Miguel, Assistant Superintendent for Facilities and Operations, Northside ISD
Jerry Lammers, Principal, Alamo Architects

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This project had all the challenges: demolition of a 55-year-old iconic building, a program that called for a building twice as big as the one it would replace, a tight, sloped site with traffic congestion, and construction to take place in the heart of a continuously occupied high school campus.

The Goal for the 2014 Northside ISD Bond project was to replace Holmes High School fine arts building with a new, state-of-the-art facility comparable to one built for a new high school within the District. The limited site and budget led the project team to re-evaluate the district’s Design Guide with goal of consolidating spaces and reducing square footage without compromising the function of the facility. The new Holmes Fine Arts Center contains all the performing, visual, and theater arts programs for the campus including the District’s first specifically designed mariachi hall. The heart of the building is a 900-seat auditorium with a large stage that contains a full fly loft and orchestra pit.

The presentation will highlight the processes the project team utilized to update and the district’s high school fine arts’ program, innovative design strategies that reduced the building’s foot print, and logistics used to construct the new facility.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn how innovative programming can reduce the square footage of a fine arts center while maintaining function and parity across campuses
  • Explore strategies for improving vehicular and pedestrian circulation at existing campuses
  • Learn basic school auditorium components, and functional relationships, and new trends in layouts
  • Explore strategies for constructing new facilities on existing and occupied campuses.
Friday, April 5, 2019 | 2:30 PM – DURING TOUR AT SCHOOL
Ten Years of Sustainable School Design Success and a Plan for the Future: An Evaluation of Northside ISD’s Past, Current, and Future High Performance Building Strategies
    4 LU

Speakers
Leroy San Miguel, Assistant Superintendent for Facilities and Operations, Northside ISD
Jerry Lammers, Principal, Alamo Architects

View presentation »

A large, fast growth district, the Northside ISD has had a long history of building energy efficient, low maintenance schools. In 2007, the district adopted a goal of building their future schools to “Green” or sustainable construction standards and piloted two new schools through building certification programs. Since then, the district has built 12 schools each of which have been certified as either TX-CHPS- Designed (Texas Collaborative for High Performance Schools) or United States Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED Silver. With recent updates to TX-CHPS, LEED for Schools, and the Energy Conservation Codes, the district went through a a re-evaluation of the high performance building certification programs it uses to determine if these programs were still the best fit and should be utilized for the district’s upcoming 2018 capital improvement bond campaign. The presentation will give a brief overview of TX-CHPS and LEED for Schools, review the Northside ISD’s experience with these certification programs, and the show the direction of the district chose for its future high performance building program.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the basics of TX-CHPS and LEED for Schools
  • Review Northside ISD’s experience with High Performance school design and construction
  • Review Northside ISD’s experience with High Performance school design and construction
  • Review the cost / benefit of some high performance building strategies to determine their inclusion in future construction programs
Friday, April 5, 2019 | 2:15 PM – DURING TOUR AT SCHOOL
Building Community Trust Through Community Engagement to Pass a Bond
    4 LU

Speakers
Matthew Mann, Ed. D., Pleasanton ISD
Kate Mraw, RID, LPA, inc.
Lowell Tacker, LPA, inc.

Passing a successful bond measure can be a significant challenge for many Texas school districts. When you consider the factors that contribute to bond messaging, the process of listening is just as, if not more, important as how the needs are communicated to the public. Communication is key; in this session, the Superintendent of Pleasanton ISD will share how a district who previously failed two bonds worked collaboratively with their design firm to create a process that engaged the community in a path of discovery and understanding.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the challenges a small district faces when the facility doesn’t match the quality of education
  • Hear from Pleasanton ISD’s Matthew Man, Ed.D. about the importance of engaging your community in a deeper and more integral way
  • Understand the power in the process of discovery and understanding
  • Gain best practices and talking points for passing a successful bond measure.
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