Sessions

Marriott Spartanburg September 16-18, 2020
Creating Engaging Learning Spaces in the Hub City – Centering Around Learning
Spartanburg Marriott
Spartanburg, SC

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2020 | 8:15 AM – 9:30 AM
Keynote: Connecting for Student Success
Heritage Ballroom

Keynote Speaker:
Jasmeen M. Shaw, P.E.

Message: Who is Ultimately Responsible?

The System of Checks & Balances:
  • The Office of School Facilities (OSF) Process
  • Code Changes Related to Education
  • Radio Communication
  • Fire & Safety Inspections
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2020 | 9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
21E School Design – Twenty First Century Education and Energy
Croft

    1 HSW

Speakers:
Kenneth Stanfield, Principal Architect, Sherman Carter Barnhart Architects
Justin McElfresh, Principal Architect, Sherman Carter Barnhart Architects

The topic of 21E School Design will focus on several criteria applicable to HSW Design credits. First, the net zero energy design strategies and case study will enable attendees to apply the techniques to their own projects to increase their energy efficiency. Second, attendees will learn how to incorporate twenty first century interior design elements that not only enhance the learning environment, but also aid in reducing the building's energy demands. Finally, attendees will learn how to identify and implement the sustainable design choices in materials that help meet the design criteria for a 21E school.

What is a 21E School? A school designed to engage and inspire learning in a safe, healthy, and sustainable environment while eliminating energy costs. The design strategies for twenty first century learning spaces and zero energy are complimentary and when combined as an overall design goal, achieve dramatic results. Attendees will learn the essential design strategies necessary to dramatically reduce energy consumption while creating learning spaces that focus on the four "c's" – collaboration, critical thinking, creativity, and communication. The nation's latest zero energy school, Jennings Creek Elementary, in Bowling Green, Kentucky, will be used as a case study to describe and showcase the design characteristics of a 21E school.

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to identify the design strategies necessary to achieve a zero-energy school project.
  • Participants will be able to benchmark an attainable energy use intensity (EUI) using the case study net zero school.
  • Participants will be able to calculate the efficiency of an overall design using the zero energy design criteria ratios of floor area, wall area, and roof area for the case study school.
  • Participants will be able to select a number of materials that aid in the pursuit of sustainable and resilient design based on the 21E criteria for twenty first century interior learning spaces.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Educational Visioning: Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Context: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

Playing with Endless Possibilities: Designing Inclusive Playgrounds for all Students
Daniel Morgan A

    1 HSW

Speakers:
Dr. Meghan Ketterman, Director of Business Development, Contract Construction
Jill Moore, Marketing Specialist, Landscape Structures, Carolina Parks and Play
Adam Bugenske, President, Leo’s Pride Foundation

This proposal meets all three Health, Safety and Welfare components due to the fact that knowledge of the design of inclusive playgrounds will have beneficial effects among users of the sites for a safe and healthy learning environments for all children, will limits and prevents accidental injury or death among users of the sites as they meet all ADA standards and requirements, and overall welfare of users due to the demonstrable positive emotional responses and equal access by users of these sites.

Close your eyes and let your imagination take you back to the days of recess on the playground. Voices of children laughing as they play echo in the distance, just one sign of children learning and challenging themselves during precious years of childhood. Whether it’s swinging on monkey bars or flying through the air on a swing set, playgrounds are often where children test their own limits and grow exponentially. They are rich landscapes full of cognitive, sensory, social, physical and emotional benefits. However, some children aren’t included in this formative landscape. 1 in 26 people in the United States have some sort of disability- be it cognitive, learning disorders, or even autism, leaving unmet needs and missing out on the benefits of being kids. School districts face a growing student population with special needs thus having the unique ability to encourage special education student development and personal growth. This session is dedicated to increasing awareness of our district leaders about ways inclusive play and outdoor activities can benefit their special education programs. Our interactive and unique presentation will discuss ways schools can implement playground elements, further developing healthy students, families and communities. Welcoming innovation and inclusion for all student populations is just one-way districts can create special areas designed for children of all ages and abilities.

Learning Objectives:
  • The learner will acquire new knowledge regarding the need for and the design of inclusive playgrounds and equipment to meet accessibility requirements set by ADA.
  • The learner will be able to describe several components of an all-inclusive playground.
  • The learner will be able to compare and contrast different playgrounds and pieces of equipment designed for inclusivity for all children.
  • The learner will be able to design a sample of an inclusive playground.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Context: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

Can Finland’s Egalitarianism Change South Carolina Education Outcomes?
Wadsworth

    1 LU

Speakers:
Dr. Russell Booker, Superintendent, Spartanburg District Seven
Lynne Wilson, Interior Designer, McMillan Pazdan Smith

In a land where teaching is revered as a prestigious position of importance, there is a certain uncommon degree of trust that exists between teachers and stakeholders. From Helsinki to the remote villages along the Arctic Circle, Finland is a nation where nearly every student finds academic success with open-ended pathways in their future – an education model built on caring for the whole student with uncompromising commitment and a vision for equality. As one of the best public education systems in the world, Finland can teach South Carolina’s public schools numerous distinct lessons in holistic 21st century education. And, Spartanburg District 7’s Superintendent, Dr. Russell Booker had the opportunity in 2018 to take advantage of these lessons as part of a fact-finding team touring Finland to study their school systems. The resulting inspired design and progressive pedagogy on display in Spartanburg District 7’s new Spartanburg High School is therefore not an accident, but a product of Finnish inspiration. Viewed as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to address the global economy by shaping the young minds of the next generation, this simple, elegant environment was designed to elevate the student experience by embodying core tenets of innovation, collaboration, flexibility, diversity, and sustainability. Like many Scandinavian campuses, learning occurs anywhere and everywhere across a beautiful, welcoming and responsible campus. Large classrooms and formal and informal gathering areas throughout the building and site accommodate project-based learning and foster an environment of open exchange. Equipped with specially selected furniture systems, these spaces enhance the student experience facilitate development that transitions from classroom to common space and back again.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the relationship between environmental design and pedagogy that leads to open and engaging learning spaces.
  • Define physical characteristics of teaching environments that promote innovation, flexibility, diversity and collaboration.
  • Identify the benefits of open learning environments and which design and planning decisions lead to successful implementation.
  • Explain the role of play, exploration, creativity, and socialization in 21st century education environments for the next generation of citizens and workforce.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Context: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

Special Design Thoughts for Special Education Programming
Dogwood

    1 HSW

Speaker:
Traci M. Hogan, Assistant Superintendent for Special Education, The School District of Greenville County

When planning for school facilities, it is imperative that school design and construction team have a basic understanding of disability terminology and programming requirements that must be considered. The collaboration and partnership between the design planners and leaders of programming for students with disability is key to successful design and implementation. This session will provide an overview of special education, a discussion of strategies to assist in planning for the collaboration between facilities/design staff and special educators, and building specifications that should be considered.

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to identify initial steps in working with programming supervisors of students with disabilities.
  • Participants will be able to identify specific design needs related to a special education classroom.
  • Participants will be able to demonstrate how successful design is connected to successful instruction.
  • Participants will be able to identify relevant characteristics of state and/or federal laws pertaining to planning and implementation of facilities and services for students with disabilities.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Educational Visioning: Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Educational Facility Pre-Design Planning: Manages a master planning process that combines educational planning, facilities assessment and utilization, demographic research, capital planning and educational specifications with a community-based vision to establish a plan for learning environments. This includes the ability to translate existing or aspirational instructional models to specific programming and spatial relationships.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2020 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Collaboration, Wellness, and Supporting Project Based Learning in K-12 Facilities
Croft

    1 HSW

Speakers:
Benjamen Metz, AIA, LEED AP, Senior Design Manager, Earl Swensson Associates
David Minnigan, AIA, IIDA, LEED AP, Principal, Earl Swensson Associates
Kearra Barkley, IIDA, NCIDQ, Interior Designer, Earl Swensson Associates

This presentation was recently given at the Tennessee Chapter of Association for Learning Environments and is already an approved AIA HSW CEU. Applicable to Health and Welfare based on teaching methods for enhanced opportunities for educating children and discussing strategies for incorporating Wellness features into the education environment.

The presentation by Earl Swensson Associates Architects will share the project goals, the importance of client communication, and the importance of incorporating spaces for differentiated learning into a 21st century learning environment. The case study of two recently completed facilities in rural Middle Tennessee describes design strategies for supporting wellness, collaborative environments and Project Based Learning curriculum in schools, while being considerate of a tight budget and taxpayer dollars.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn strategies for promoting collaboration among students and faculty
  • Learn ways to incorporate wellness design features into schools
  • Learn ways to facilitate and support multi-disciplinary and Project Based Learning in the built environment
  • Explore options for supporting different learning styles

ALEP Core Competencies:

Educational Visioning: Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Learning: Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Commissioning to Achieve Better Learning Environments
Daniel Morgan A

    1 HSW

Speaker:
Matt Pesce, P.E., CEM, CxA, CMVP, Principal, Facility Strategies Group, LLC

The topic discusses the intersection between building performance and the health and the resulting learning performance of students and discusses how commissioning ensures that the building performs as designed. An example is ventilation. Studies have shown that the correct amounts of ventilation air remove indoor pollutants and create an environment that reduces sick days. Commissioning of ventilation systems is a critical part of design, construction, and operation of schools.

This workshop session provides an overview of how indoor environments impact learning and discusses how integration of effective commissioning during capital retrofits and new construction projects can facilitate improved building performance. Studies in the U.S. and worldwide have shown that improved lighting, indoor air quality, thermal comfort, and acoustics result in increased reading fluency, higher math scores, and increased attendance. Commissioning during design and construction ensures that school district performance requirements are included in design, carry through to procurement, and are practiced throughout construction. This program will discuss the building systems that affect learning performance and the aspects of commissioning that are used to ensure these systems perform as intended and will include examples from recent projects.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify building systems that affect student performance
  • Discuss research and best practices that result that result in student health and student learning
  • Describe the key elements of the commissioning process
  • Discuss the benefits of commissioning on executing the owner’s objectives including health, learning objectives, operating savings, and improved equipment life

ALEP Core Competencies:

Educational Facility Implementation, Project Management/Project Delivery: Has a working understanding of how the following areas impact the facility program: regulations and policies; project delivery methodologies; scheduling; preventative maintenance; life-cycle planning; and systems commissioning.

Process: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

Richland One Journey to Success: Pedagogy Propelling Places
Wadsworth

    1 LU

Speakers:
Dr. Erica Fields, Director of Learning Environments and Instructional Resources, Richland One School District
Jill Allshouse, ALEP certified Instructional Designer, MeTEOR Education

Hear from Richland One district leaders as to how the vision for teaching and learning served as the catalyst for modernizing learning spaces. Providing active learning experiences rich with technology, collaboration and flexibility was critical to creating the synergy needed between the environment and the pedagogy to prepare all learners to be future ready. Leaders will share their challenges and successes throughout their journey on transforming education to humanize the system.

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide real world insight into the journey a school district took to create Future Ready Learning Spaces
  • Learn how the granular elements of the Vision for Teaching and Learning led to environment design
  • Learn how a strategic plan for environment support with educators led to successfully shifting mindset
  • Learn how the collaboration between district leaders, educators and designers led to thoughtful design to support teaching and learning for all learners

ALEP Core Competencies:

Educational Visioning: Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Learning: Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2020 | 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM
A Natural Vision: The data-driven impact of biophilic design for student success
Croft

    1 HSW

Speakers:
Jim Determan, FAIA, Principal, Craig Gaulden Davis
Anthony Cox, PE, Chief Operating Officer, Rock Hill Schools

Health – This is a presentation of AIA-funded research that provides evidence of learning space design that is strongly associated with student stress reduction – a direct health benefit. Safety – In an environment that produces stress reduction, calming, restored attention and better learning outcomes, students are less likely to act out in bullying, aggression or violence. While there are wonderful new ideas about how to make the school safer, this is design that makes the student safer. Welfare – We will show that biophilic learning spaces are strongly associated with enhanced learning outcomes- a direct welfare benefit.

Districts invest millions of dollars into school buildings and want maximum learning results for every dollar spent. Our sustainability program seeks not only to conserve natural and financial resources, but to improve the quality of the learning environment. Partnering for research-based innovative practices in academics and operations guides us to explore the application of biophilic design principles as a means to improve student achievement through the built environment. We will introduce new, ground-breaking research by a team of architects, scientists, educators and artists showing how health benefits of the natural environment are applied within built space reducing student stress and inspiring a traditionally lacking student demographic to enhanced learning outcomes. Session outline:
  1. The neuroscience theory of visual function, perception and architecture
  2. Recent history of biophilic design research and proven effects
  3. Experiment methodology and assessment
  4. Findings of positive impacts to stress reduction and cognitive development
  5. Design drivers and their impact for future learning space design

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to incorporate specific biophilic design strategies that will produce a positive impact on learning space users’ well-being and academic success.
  • Upon completion of the session instructors and designers will have access to new assessment tools to evaluate the stress of students in their classrooms.
  • Participants can apply the principles of neuroscience theory of visual function and perception that promote an ease of brain processing, creating spaces that afford a relaxed and focus to classroom problem solving.
  • Participants can download the research report with references to precedent research on the health benefits of biophilic design.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Toolbox: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

How to Eliminate the Stigma of Change and Improve Learner Engagement
Daniel Morgan A

    1 LU

Speakers:
Taryn Kinney, AIA, Architect, Principal, DLR Group
Phillip Nowlin, Principal, Canyon View High School, Agua Fria Union High School District 216

Educators and learners deserve the best environment to try new experiences, build skills, and contribute to their communities. Schools work hard to change from outdated approaches toward learner-centric education that support these experiences, however, 70 percent of change efforts fail. What does it take to create and sustain a new culture? Through decades of working with school systems, we identified a disconnect between district academic vision, facilities, and campus implementation. Founded in research completed at Columbia University’s Teachers College, our solution bridges organization, learning, and design (BOLD) to ensure every educator and learner find fulfillment. Participants will hear lessons learned from school districts that have implemented change successfully and will leave with research-based techniques to guide transitions at their home district.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand how the role of consistent leadership is critical to any change process.
  • Understand the meaning of Participatory Design and the value it can bring to teacher engagement and in turn student performance.
  • Understand change processes and take-away tools to best implement.
  • Understand how to engage parents, local businesses, students, and teachers around the necessity for continuous change and improvement.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Educational Facility Implementation, Project Management/Project Delivery: Has a working understanding of how the following areas impact the facility program: regulations and policies; project delivery methodologies; scheduling; preventative maintenance; life-cycle planning; and systems commissioning.

Toolbox: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

Why Pre-Design Matters: The Power of Building Assessment and Community Engagement in a High School Replacement Project
Wadsworth

    1 LU

Speakers:
Donna Francis, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Principal, Clark Nexsen
Becky Brady, AIA, CDT, LEED AP BD+C, Architect, Clark Nexsen
Dr. Diann Kearney, Interim Principal, Wake County Public Schools

Working with an existing school community can be challenging while at the same time incredibly rewarding when stakeholder voices are heard. Using the story of the replacement of Apex High School in Apex, NC as a case study, this course explores how a complete existing building assessment incorporates community engagement and building performance modeling as tools to inform the design of 21 Century Educational Spaces. Committing appropriate time and effort to these early design phases is crucial to identifying project priorities and goals while reinforcing a sense of collective ownership and commitment to a globally responsible and collaborative design solution.

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to identify the connections between stakeholder input, design process and building outcomes.
  • Participants will be exposed to building assessment techniques and documentation.
  • Participants will be able to facilitate community engagement sessions and work with clients to reconcile priorities and goals against equitable project guidelines and requirements.
  • Participants will be exposed to early building performance modeling techniques and evaluation which can inform design decisions.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Community Engagement: Leads the internal and external communities through a discovery process that articulates and communicates a community-based foundational vision, forming the basis of a plan for the design of the learning environment. The vision is achieved through a combination of rigorous research, group facilitation, strategic conversations, qualitative and quantitative surveys and workshops. Demonstrates the skill to resolve stakeholder issues while embedding a community's unique vision into the vision for its schools.

Process: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2020 | 9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
The Value of Outdoor Environments: Enhancing Health, Well Being and Safety for Students and Teachers
Croft

    1 HSW

Speaker:
Becky Brady, AIA, CDT, LEED AP BD+C, Architect, Clark Nexsen

This session topic relates directly to mental and physical health and well-being, as well as safety in schools.

In regard to school safety, focused attention still lies on how to handle an active shooter situation. However, there is an argument for that focus to shift to a more holistic approach in an effort to prevent such instances from occurring in the first place, and encompass safety on all levels, not just the most extreme. We need to ensure that students feel safe and receive the day-to-day support needed to enhance their health (mental and physical) and well-being in a safe school environment. Research indicates the value of outdoor connections and the benefit to students' mental health, leading to higher student engagement and test scores, and notably, fewer violent incidents. In this course, we will look at how outdoor environments can greatly benefit students through many different forms including outdoor education, outdoor play, outdoor experience and outdoor exposure.

Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the benefits of outdoor environments to students' mental and physical health through outdoor education, play, experience and exposure, leading to reduced stress, decreased disruptive behavior, development of positive social interactions, and empathy for other students.
  • Think of safety in schools as a multi-faceted issue to be approached in a holistic way; going beyond physical security measures to integrate intangible elements to promote safety.
  • Understand the importance of the reciprocal role of a school and its community in relation to safety.
  • Learn how an elementary school in North Carolina uses outdoor environments and community as a part of everyday curriculum to enhance student well-being and safety.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Assessment of the School Facility: The ability to objectively evaluate a learning environment post-occupancy and utilize that data to improve future projects. Implements a plan for educational commissioning that provides guidance on how to use and maximize the learning environment to meet the foundational vision established in the planning phase.

Learning: Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

CEPT – What? CPTED and Schools
Daniel Morgan A

    1 HSW

Speaker:
Bill Laughlin, Vice President, Moseley Architects

This topic if squarely focused on how to better protect teachers and students.

An overview of CPTED (Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design) strategies and how they can effectively and affordably be applied to school environments. Presented by Bill Laughlin, AIA, REFP, and CPD (CPTED Professional Designation) with a school-side employee with an interest in school safety.

Learning Objectives:
  • Overview of CPTED.
  • How can it be effectively applied to a K12 environment.
  • What are the cost implications.
  • How to prioritize the options.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Context: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

Visibility: Risk Mitigation in School Design
Wadsworth

    1 HSW

Speaker:
Brian Crutchfield, PE, PLS, Principal, Timmons Group

The central theme of Brian's presentation is safety within school design. He will discuss the ways that designers can use visibility in their site design to mitigate the safety risks students face at school. All four learning objectives discuss how visibility is used to design safer schools.

Due to recent tragic events, student safety has become a hot topic of discussion among parents, school officials, students and now designers. Brian Crutchfield gives his perspective on designing school sites in a time when safety has become the top priority. He will explain in four tips how visibility is one of the greatest tools for risk mitigation in school design. At the end of every school day, as concerned parents, school officials, and community members, we all want our students home safely. Ensuring a safe learning environment is always our number 1 priority as a team, and the safety of our students will always be the most important factor so that they feel safe in a place where they will, ultimately, spend almost 1/3 of their adolescent life.

Learning Objectives:
  • Establish prominent building entry points during school hours. For starters, when it’s difficult to see who comes and goes on school grounds, it is tough to defend against unwanted intruders. To do this, schools should be designed with the administrative offices positioned in the front of the building with clear visibility of the outside. Also keeping all other building entry points locked and requiring everyone to check-in at the administrative offices before proceeding throughout the building gives the administrative team the visibility and authority of those coming in and out of the building.
  • Having those beautiful big windows for an easy view of the outside grounds is a huge plus, but if you don’t have proper lighting outside, those huge windows don’t make much sense. Tip #2: Install campus lighting around the property. Just being able to see the grounds clearly allows school staff to monitor it properly. So, in the winter when it gets dark at 5pm, proper lighting on school grounds makes it easy to spot suspicious activity, even in the dark.
  • Every school site has the opportunity to use landscaping to enhance the safety of site. Tip #3: Strategic landscaping enables easy surveillance without providing hiding places for intruders. I would suggest planting low prickly shrubs and keeping trees limbed-up so that those unwanted visitors can’t hide behind a tall bush or leafy tree. Also, this keeps the grounds looking neat and clean, so win-win there – continuous maintenance and safety surveillance.
  • One person can only be monitoring one side of the building at once. Tip #4: Install security cameras and signage notifying visitors that the building is under constant surveillance. Strategically installing security cameras around the perimeter and at all entry/exit points of the building enables the administrative team to see the visitors as they approach or leave the building. This also helps to scope out any suspicious behavior going on outside that needs to be remediated or further monitored.

ALEP Core Competencies:

Design of Educational Facilities: Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Context: Content of this session/workshop will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that distinguishes the project from other applications.

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