Sessions

Building Bridges for Education March 31 – April 2, 2019
Building Bridges for Education
Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Monday, April 1, 2019 | 10:45 am – 11:45 am
Think Better: Attention In Education – How Can Neuroscience Research Help Us Optimize Student Success?
Knollwood C Breakout Room

Speaker:
Karl Kinscherf, Steelcase Education

    1 LU/HSW

In educational environments throughout the world, scenarios of near-constant distraction have become the norm. Students juggle multiple screens and devices at the same time, and become distracted by friends passing by in the library. Study spaces are often too isolating or too public, and lack technology access that allows for sustained, productive work. This lack of attention has real implications for students’ academic performance and success. In fact, research from Carnegie Mellon shows that students interrupted by technology score 20% lower on standard cognition tests. To learn how to better support student focus in learning spaces, Steelcase researchers explored what neuroscience tells us about attention. Integrated with ongoing investigations into student behavior, neuroscience research findings inspired new perspectives and concepts for how environments can enhance student engagement and learning outcomes. In this course, you will discover seven insights about student attention and the design solutions that can help nurture it. The course also covers a range of flexible spaces that take both the brain and the body into consideration.

Learning Objectives
  • Learn how to better support student focus in learning spaces.
  • Discover seven insights about student attention and the design solutions that can help nurture it.
  • Learn how neuroscience research findings inspired new perspectives and concepts for how environments can enhance student engagement and learning outcomes.
  • Dive into the science behind attention and applying those insights to the classroom.

Competency: Educational Visioning
Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professionals while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Best Design Practices for School Security
Bethabara Breakout Room

Speakers:
Marques Moore, AIA, LS3P Associates, Ltd.
Ginny Magrath, AIA, LS3P Associates, Ltd.

    1 LU/HSW

Recent news events have brought school security to the forefront of discussions about educational facilities design. School systems, students, teachers, families, and the wider community naturally want the safest possible facilities in the event of an emergency. This session will explore best practices for school security through the lens of architectural design including security audits, Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles, concentric zones of security, maintaining safe egress, and integrated technology. The safety of our students is our number one priority.

Learning Objectives
  • Participants will be able to identify steps for securing K12 schools through CPTED principles.
  • Participants will be able to critically think about school security and student safety through example projects.
  • Participants will be able to formulate goals for their district or strategies for design that promote the health and wellness of communities.
  • Participants will be able to prepare budgets and estimate the cost of building design principles related to safety and security.

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Process
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

Monday, April 1, 2019 | 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
SchoolsNEXT 2019 Presentation
Hearn Grand Ballroom

    1 LU/HSW

Monday, April 1, 2019 | 2:15 pm – 3:15 pm
Yes, you can have it too! Case studies of STEM upgrades in existing schools
Knollwood C Breakout Room

Speakers:
Vern McKissick, AIA, ALEP, LEED AP, McKissick Architects
R. Wayne Roberts, AIA, REFP, CPTED, McKissick Architects

    1 LU

To have robust 21st Century education, students from all backgrounds need access to high quality STEM/STEAM programming. With aging school infrastructure, the belief is often that STEM requires new building (be it an addition or a completely new facility), but this just isn’t the case. In the current financial climate, funding can prove elusive especially for smaller school systems without major growth or with failing systems/safety/security concerns that can get the attention of the local commissioner and taxpayers. In this presentation McKissick Associates will provide case studies in three successful low-cost STEM/STEAM renovation and renovation/addition projects in buildings dating from the 1920s to 1950s. These case studies will outline low and moderate budget strategies that smaller school systems can employ to remake existing physical plans for both short- and long-term goals. This presentation will be particularly relevant to small schools with combined 6-12, 7-12, or 9-12 enrollments of 500 to 700 students, but also offers useful ideas for larger school systems with aging infrastructure.

Learning Objectives
  • Challenge the idea that STEM/STEAM education always requires new construction to be effective.
  • Identify common characteristics of spaces which are candidates to be renovated into STEM/STEAM facilities.
  • Identify low to medium cost solutions for STEM/STEAM renovations.
  • Understand the placement of 21st Century spaces and adjacencies in renovated schools.

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Design Through the Decades: Can Past Trends in School Architecture Inform the Future?
Bethabara Breakout Room

Speaker:
Elizabeth Epstein, DeKalb County (GA)

    1 LU

Are new trends in school design really new? Are we learning from the past? Using archival documentation of the extensive inventory of facilities from a large urban district in Atlanta, participants will look at representative floor plans from each decade of the past century of built schools. What parallels can we make? How have students outcomes been affected? Can we reinterpret architecture from the past effectively?

Learning Objectives
  • Identify historic trends in American K12 school design.
  • Learn about historic trends in American K12 curriculum.
  • Examine impact of environment on student outcomes.
  • Look at correlation between past and current trends in school design.

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session/workshop will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Monday, April 1, 2019 | 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Optimizing Daylighting: Balanced Approach for Today’s Learning Environments
Knollwood C Breakout Room

Speakers:
Jeanne Huntsman, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, The Weidt Group
Elizabeth Bowen, MBA, PEM, LEED AP, The Weidt Group
Brian Callaway, Mayer Electric (formerly with Durham Public Schools)

    1 LU/HSW

Does daylighting seem out of reach for school design budgets? Does increased security in schools threaten to eliminate your project’s daylighting design? How does daylighting enhance the learning environment? The conversation is changing on the use of natural light in buildings in response to new technologies and design strategies. This session reviews approaches to optimize natural light while balancing other design considerations such as security, energy, 21st century learning environments, and project budgets. Best practices and lessons learned from real-world projects will be uncovered, along with tips to engage diverse stakeholders.

Learning Objectives
  • Optimize natural light while considering security, energy, and budget priorities.
  • Evaluate the impact of daylight harvesting on overall building operational cost.
  • Consider energy savings and other benefits of daylighting systems.
  • Identify strategies for project team collaboration in optimizing daylighting design.

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Toolbox
Content of this session/workshop will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

When is Zero Energy the Right Choice?
Bethabara Breakout Room

Speakers:
Tony Hans, PE, RCDD, LEED AP, CMTA
Zachary Schneider, PE, LEED AP, LC, CxA, CMTA

    1 LU

Zero Energy projects have increased by 700% and Zero Energy Schools are leading the change. This session will discuss the numerous ways Zero Energy Schools are being achieved throughout the country. Zero Energy has become a bridge to education and a connection to true Curriculum Integration. The positive impacts on learning through live data from the built environment are giving teachers new and exciting ways to engage students. Live examples and lessons learned will be shared.

Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the design issues affecting Zero Energy buildings
  • Discover the numerous ways Zero Energy Schools are being achieved
  • Emphasize a bridge to learning achieved through Zero Energy
  • Define a model for cost effective Zero Energy building design

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 | 9:00 am – 10:30 am
Group Session: Panel Discussion on School Safety
Hearn Grand Ballroom

Panelists:
Paul Davis Boney, FAIA
Chris Blice
Chief Arthur Frye
Dr. Leslie Alexander
Monika Johnson Hostler
Noel Glacer
Jake Glacer

    1.5 LU/HSW

Panel Questions
  1. Many other countries do not have incidents of school shootings that we have in the United States. What can we learn from these other countries, and how can we incorporate these solutions in our schools and communities?
  2. How can we secure outdoor areas without trapping occupants if the shooter is a student or person inside the building. How does this reconcile with the CPTED principal of natural surveillance?
  3. Two of the most talked about issues in school design today are security from potential shooters and creating collaborative learning environments. Collaborative learning environments benefit from natural light and interior connectivity which are derived in large part from both exterior and interior windows. In some districts, there is a lot of talk about taking windows out of schools or using bullet proof glass which can be cost prohibitive. How can we talk thru this with the community and school planners to obtain the best results?
  4. How can we better train the school staff, students and parent or visitors to each school about what to expect? It still seems to be very easy to access many schools on a daily basis with very few questions.
  5. Since so many school shootings seem to be carried out by current or former students, what is being done to address the social conditions that are leading to these acts? Securing schools like prisons would only seem to add to the conditions that are creating the problem.
  6. In regards to new school design, what are the new security trends and how do they align with research on previous incidents to give us confidence that they will be effective?

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