Program Abstracts

2019 Northeast Conference March 27-30, 2019
Revolutionizing Education
Hyatt Regency Cambridge
Boston, Massachusetts

WEDNESDAY | MARCH 27, 2019 | 10:00 – 11:00 AM
Effective Learning Spaces

    1 LU/HSW

Speaker
Dr. Daniel Gray Wilson, Harvard Graduate School of Education

How are spaces designed to effectively support learning? This brief will share the latest research that links qualities of spaces to a variety of learning outcomes. In addition, it will put forward a model developed at Harvard’s “Learning Environments for Tomorrow (LEFT)” Institute to aid teachers, school leaders, and designers to effectively create formal and informal environments to support a range of learning goals.

THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2019 | 8:00 – 9:15 AM
General Session: Panel Discussion – Next Generation Education / Next Generation Schools
Charles View Ballroom

    1 LU

Panelists
Dr. R.J. Webber, Assistant Superintendent, Novi Community School District, Novi, MI
Dr. Drew Echelson, Superintendent, Waltham Public Schools
Dr. Donna J. DeSiato, Superintendent of Schools, East Syracuse Minoa Central School District, East Syracuse, NY
Ryan Lynch, Principal Gates Middle School, Scituate Public Schools, Scituate, MA
Ty Thurlow, M.Ed., Principal, Sumner Memorial High School, Sullivan, ME
Denise Rush, Interim Dean of Interior Architecture, Boston Architectural College
Dr. James Morse, Superintendent, Oyster River Cooperative School District, Durham, NH

THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2019 | 9:30 – 10:30 AM
Make It Real: Utilizing Building Information Modeling and 3-D Virtual Reality Visualization to Improve and Enhance the School Design Experience
Cambridge Room

    1 LU

Speakers
Philip Conte, AIA, NCARB, StudioJAED Architects & Engineers
Gabe Cheung, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, StudioJAED Architects & Engineers

Many school end users are relatively inexperienced in understanding the design process, including the “reality” as depicted in 2-D drawings. 3-D renderings of critical space components can be used effectively to provide them with understandable design information. However, having the ability to immerse them into various spaces via 3-D Virtual Reality (VR), where they can both “explore” and “change” the space, is an invaluable and effective tool in school design. This is especially helpful in the design of classrooms and other specialty spaces such as media centers, makerspaces, and learning commons. The end result may very well be better and more “user-friendly” space design that enhances both teaching and learning. The efficacy of this VR tool will be explored in detail with practical demonstrations where participants can actually engage in interior and building design utilizing VR.

This seminar will cover several acceptable AIA LU/HSW topics including:
  • Building design
  • Interior design
  • Material use, function, and features
  • Security of buildings, design

Learning Objectives
  1. Participants will understand how BIM and VR can be utilized to enhance the design process.
  2. Participants will understand the various capabilities of VR technology in design, including walk-through and flythrough video production, and real-time VR collaboration.
  3. Participants will be able to understand how VR can provide invaluable assistance in allowing designers to run checks for vertical clearance issues and fall hazards, clash detection, lighting analysis, walking distance analysis, daylighting, and numerous other issues.
  4. Participants will be able to actually experience VR tools in action by utilizing both projected video and Oculus Rift VR through headset viewing.

Competency: Educational Facility Pre-Design Planning
Manages a master planning process that combines educational planning, facilities assessment and utilization, demographic research, capital planning and educational specifications with a community-based vision to establish a plan for learning environments. This includes the ability to translate existing or aspirational instructional models to specific programming and spatial relationships.

Domain: Process
Content of this session will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

Design for Safe and Healthy Children | A study of best practices for school safety, mental health, and wellness
Crispus Attucks Room

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Ann Neeriemer, Perkins Eastman
Robert Bell, AIA, ALEP, CPTED, LEED AP BD+C, Perkins Eastman
Pallavi Puranik, RA, WELL AP, LEED GA, Perkins Eastman DC

View presentation »

Public media has been flooded with stories of gun violence in schools over the past twenty years. As important and tragic as these events are, they sometimes overshadow equally concerning, and more frequently occurring, incidents such as self-harm, depression, bullying, substance abuse, and assault that occur in schools every year.

Over the past 8 months, a research team at Perkins Eastman has undertaken a study of factors that contribute to the safety and security of schools. The initial premise of the study is that students learn better and are more successful when they feel safe. The study gathers data and research from many sources to understand the many aspects relating to child development, mental health, and well-being. In this session, the team will present over-arching themes recognized from this research and discuss some of the unique perspectives provided from case study schools in rural, suburban, and urban locations.

This topic is applicable to HSW credits because it explores various aspects of school building design and how they affect physical as well as emotional and mental wellbeing and safety of students and other occupants.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand key factors contributing to school safety.
  2. Discuss how various features related to “hardening” or “softening” in schools relate to a child’s development, mental health, and well being.
  3. Analyze similarities and differences of perceived threats and design responses for three types of schools: urban, suburban, and rural.
  4. Explore how designers and educators can collaborate to create safe and welcoming environments for students.

Competency: Educational Visioning
Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professional while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Domain:

What Do I Do with My Stuff? The Shift from Professional Neighbors to Professional Roommates
Thomas Paine AB Room

    1 LU

Speakers
Jason Boone, Dore & Whittier Architects
Ryan Lynch, Gates Middle School

View presentation »

Best practices for middle school suggest that teams of content teachers should work together collaboratively. To be the most effective, sometimes this means teachers no longer owning a classroom space, but sharing a suite of instructional spaces...effectively changing the dynamic between the team members from professional neighbors (adults who occupy adjacent spaces and each with ultimate autonomy over their single classroom environment that must perform all spatial duties) to professional roommates (adults who jointly occupy a range of instructional spaces that must collectively decide when and how best to use each one). This session will explore the experiences of professionals at Gates Middle School in Scituate, MA. In a presentation and panel discussion format, teachers will respond to questions from attendees about what it's like teaching in an environment with a lot of choice and a variety of features, but that requires team members to collaborate on how and when to use the space.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the key features that differentiate between the learning environments on the team that give students and teachers flexibility and choice
  2. Understand the key features of an effective teacher planning space to make not owning classrooms viable
  3. Hear feedback from teachers occupying team spaces about how they use the collective space, how they schedule it, and how students react to not knowing exactly where they need to go each day
  4. Understand the educational benefits of having instructional spaces that are not identical

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

Fabricated Silences
Aquarium Room

    1 LU/HSW

Speaker
Joseph da Silva, PhD, AIA, REFP, RIDE School Building Authority

This workshop, a first of its kind, takes up the formative relationship between learning environments and curriculum, which I call the school design nexus. Others have queried the intersections of learning environments and curriculum, without consideration for the ways in which their relationships are culturally formative – how they reproduce or resist extant inequities in society. This session will shine a light on the cultural consequences of the school design nexus. It holds a mirror to learning environments today, and provides a much-needed historical and theoretical framework for practitioners and scholars to transform the boundaries of schooling and hold it to its founding democratic commitments.

Learning Objectives
  1. Participants will understand the earliest forms and aims of the nation’s schooling. The development and standardization of the curricula and learning environments from which our current system emerges. Unpacking the assumptions about what education should be, from its early period and how it continues to shape contemporary schooling.
  2. Participants will understand how students are and are not allowed to dwell in the built learning environment. How schools are never simply sites of just learning, but also places of repression and contestation.
  3. Participants will understand how learning environments can emancipate students and foster in them something other than the terrible inequities of class, race, and gender.
  4. Participants will understand the ways planners, architects, and educators might best respond to align teaching, learning, and environments to its founding democratic commitments of fostering emancipation, justice, and equity in a more perfect union.

Competency: Educational Facility Pre-Design Planning
Manages a master planning process that combines educational planning, facilities assessment and utilization, demographic research, capital planning and educational specifications with a community-based vision to establish a plan for learning environments. This includes the ability to translate existing or aspirational instructional models to specific programming and spatial relationships.

Domain: Context
Content of this session will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that that distinguish the project from other applications.

THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2019 | 10:45 – 11:45 AM
Values Matter: Changing the Culture of Education
Cambridge Room

    1 LU

Speakers
Catherine Wolfe, Ashley McGraw Architects
Casey Barduhn, Westhill Central School District

View presentation »

This session is designed to stretch the participants’ views and understanding of why the values of educators and designers matter in changing the culture of education.

Recognizing the changing dynamics of education, we will explore the importance of identifying and embracing the fundamental values of all stakeholders in the redesign of educational delivery and the spaces that support it. Participants will be given tools and strategies to identify core values and how to use those values to shape pedagogy and space.

We will take a close look at Central New York’s Westhill Central School District and explore how the clarity of the District’s values shaped the conversations and goals to enhance the delivery of education, how administrators and faculty members embraced the shifting educational model, and how robust guiding principles informed the creation of energized, student centered spaces. We will delve deep in understanding the outcome of incorporating these values and initiatives into the instructional and facility improvements.

Participants will learn how extensive post occupancy research done on the first phase (completed in 2018) of a two phase renovation at Westhill High School will be used to shape the pedagogy and space of the second phase currently under design.

Learning Objectives
  1. EXPLORE the values of a district and/or project to create goals for how the instruction and facilities of the district will represent the values within the institution.
  2. DESCRIBE how values impact the delivery of education.
  3. IDENTIFY design strategies used to plan and design environments, rooted in the institution‘s values, which optimize the learning and development of students.
  4. ANALYZE the outcome of incorporating values initiatives into the instructional and facility improvements through post occupancy evaluations and reflect on how successes and opportunities can feed into the programming of future initiatives / projects.

Competency: Educational Visioning
Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professional while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Domain: Process
Content of this session will focus on the importance of quality processes and practices implemented by the project team when creating learning environments. The who, what, when and how of various disciplines and applications.

Design Strategies to Create Community-Based Learning Environments for Changing Student Needs
Crispus Attucks Room

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Merilee Meacock, AIA, LEED AP, KSS Architects

View presentation »

Generation Z, those born after 1995, faces a multitude of external pressures including constant connection to social media, over protection, and heavy exposure to a 24/7 news cycle. Incidentally, this generation deals with higher rates of anxiety and depression, feelings of loneliness, lack of confidence, and separation from community and self. Today’s schools must be equipped to accommodate these behaviors and to offset the level of connection students once experienced elsewhere. Through good design, we can foster community to make school a place where students feel seen, supported, and engaged.

This session will explore how school design can impact student behavior. Strategies to be presented will include three key program elements to enrich the standard educational program: the “heart” of the school, hierarchy of space, and soft tissue/unprogrammed places. The presentation will also delve into three design approaches—biophilic, sensory, and experiential—to understand how these can be applied within educational environments. Bancroft’s Mount Laurel Campus, a national precedent for designing for students with an autism diagnosis, will be used as a case study to highlight the ways in which designing for students with the most specialized needs translates to design that benefits and empowers all students building confidence, autonomy, and community.

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify the three key program elements that will enrich a standard educational program
  2. Understand the three design approaches of biophilic, sensory, and experiential design, how they are interconnected, and how to apply them to educational environments
  3. Recognize how Bancroft’s new Mount Laurel campus addresses universal needs through architecture
  4. Articulate how the strategies used at Bancroft translate to graded schools

Competency: Educational Visioning
Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professional while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Domain: Context
Content of this session will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that that distinguish the project from other applications.

When We Come to the Place Where the School and the Makerspace Collide
Thomas Paine AB Room

    1 LU

Speakers
John Tindall-Gibson, PhD, ALEP, Drummey Rosane Andersen, Inc
Greg Smolley, AIA, APA, ALEP, LEED AP, Drummey Rosane Anderson, Inc
Jim Barrett, AIA, LEED AP, ALEP, Drummey Rosane Andersen, Inc
Philip Duffy, Town of Clinton, MA

Makerspaces are growing in popularity in communities throughout the United States. Of late, they have been finding their ways into libraries and schools. School architects will want to learn about best practices in creating Makerspaces to produce the greatest effectiveness in stimulating student engagement and achieving greater learning outcomes.

Young people love to make things. This trait is supported by a long history of educational theory, practice, and research. Learning and doing are inseparable aspects of human experience that, as they occur together, deepen understanding of our lives and the world we live in. A Makerspace can have a very natural and important role in a leaning environment.

Makerspaces are also excellent venues for the development of prized future workplace skills. They can be the perfect lab for creativity, collaboration, communication, and critical thinking and problem solving.

Makerspaces can be used by students and teachers individually, in small groups, or whole classes. Tied to the curriculum, they can be a great place for students to work on extensions of what they are learning in class. At the middle and high school levels, they can provide mentoring and equipment necessary to create a class projects, develop entrepreneurial ideas, or learn about new career pathways and skills.

As the desire to have Makerspaces in schools continues to grow, architects will have exciting and challenging opportunities to think about how building design can contribute most effectively to a revolutionary new educational practice.

Learning Objectives
  1. The participant will be able to articulate a research-based educational rationale for developing a Makerspace in a school.
  2. The participant will become aware of equipment and furniture commonly used in Makerspaces.
  3. The participant will observe several examples of how Maker projects can enrich and deepen leaning about school curriculum
  4. The participant will consider design options for different types of Makerspaces.

Competency: Educational Facility Pre-Design Planning
Manages a master planning process that combines educational planning, facilities assessment and utilization, demographic research, capital planning and educational specifications with a community-based vision to establish a plan for learning environments. This includes the ability to translate existing or aspirational instructional models to specific programming and spatial relationships.

Domain: Context
Content of this session will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that that distinguish the project from other applications.

Re-Imagining the Studio Art Classroom: From Tired to Inspired
Aquarium Room

    1 LU

Speaker
Angela Allmond, Ed.M., Teachers College, Columbia University

View presentation »

Invite! Delight! Inspire!
Is it surprising to find out that few studio art classrooms are invoking these responses from students and teachers today? It sounds impossible for a place in which art is made to be tired and uninspiring, but a picture is worth a thousand words and the photographs presented in this session will say what needs to be said. Art classrooms, new and old, have not been re-imagined for years, if ever, and it is time to consider a complete change in the way that these classrooms are designed and equipped. This session will use the data from a freshly completed dissertation research project that found design problems in studio art classrooms located in schools opened as recently as Spring 2017. The conclusion of this research is not that educators, architects and school facilities planners do not intend to design great facilities in which students and their teachers can enjoy painting, sculpting, gluing, and drawing, among so many other creative activities, in a delightful space. This is, without a doubt, the hope. The findings of this study will demonstrate, rather, that the classroom designs, furnishing options, and practical day to day operational functions of a studio art classroom often do not work well for students and teachers and are in dire need of revamping. Specific examples of design issues will be presented on topics such as built-in cabinetry and a variety of other furnishings problems, as well as sinks, storage rooms, technology, outdoor studio spaces, and classroom footprint. Other examples will include site-specific design decisions that have had unintentional, but lasting negative impacts on students and teachers. This session will offer ideas for both renovation and new construction projects and seeks to invite, delight, and inspire educators, architects and school facilities planners on ways to re-imagine the studio art classroom.

Learning Objectives
  1. The National Art Education Association’s Design Standards for School Art Facilities will be examined and discussed in order to understand how the field of art educators views the needs of the studio art classroom.
  2. Attendees will learn about specific design issues found in current studio art classrooms in the U.S. and how they affect students and teachers.
  3. Ideas will be offered for re-imagining studio art classrooms and changing perceptions about the design and arrangement of these spaces.
  4. The call to Invite! Delight! Inspire! art students will be shared and experienced by all.

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Context
Content of this session will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that that distinguish the project from other applications.

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2019 | 9:30 – 10:30 AM
Neighborhood Watch: Designing for Community and Security in the Modern World
Cambridge Room

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Mark Lee, AIA, LEED AP, Harriman
Lisa Sawin, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Harriman
Lenore Williams, Lyseth Elementary, Portland Public Schools

View presentation »

Enlisted, and entrusted, to design spaces that not only inspire young minds but keep them safe, we, as architects, are continually exploring the inherent tension between our community schools and modern security needs. Neighborhood schools are, by their very nature, a smaller, more intimate learning experience meant to intrinsically link the school to its surrounding community in a real way.

With school security top of mind for every parent, administrator, educator, and elected official in the country, we are forced to confront the difficult reality of 21st century education: our welcoming, nurturing elementary schools need to double a secure environment.

With that in mind, we find ourselves asking: how do you renovate an established neighborhood school as a safe haven without losing its essence? Architects Mark Lee, AIA and Lisa Sawin, AIA – parents themselves – join Portland Public Schools’ Principal Lenore Williams in an examination of the essential elements that make for a successful, secure project for today’s community school. What are the critical questions to ask; how do parents and teachers play a role; and what does safety look and feel like to a child? We’ll explore these and may other important topics in this 60-minute study of design and planning tools for architects and designers navigating the everchanging school security environment.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discover ways to engage parents, teachers, administrators and students in learning how to maintain, and even enhance, the school’s inherent character.
  2. Understand how to work with public safety and administrative personnel to identify and implement security provisions that marry best practices with your unique project.
  3. Explore opportunities to bring the community in without sacrificing security.
  4. Learn how we’ve used these tools in our own practice, using the Portland Public School’s Lyseth Elementary School project as a case study.

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Toolbox
Content of this session will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

Found Opportunities: Discovering a Sustainable Vision through Collaboration for the Learning Environment
Crispus Attucks Room

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Jeff Straub, AIA, REFP, LEED AP, CPD, Crabtree, Rohrbaugh & Associates Architects
Mary Lee, ALEP, School District of Philadelphia
Gamil Hall, School District of Philadelphia

View presentation »

Working with key stakeholders for the redevelopment of a urban school that has served it’s community for 70 years, how do you reimagine the elementary education program to meet 21st Century concepts, be fiscally responsible, and help kick-start a $5 billion city wide revitalization program. This was the challenge presented to The School District of Philadelphia (SDP) in 2017 when beginning a capital program for their 339 schools and starting with one of their largest elementary schools which was discovered to be structurally unsound during early investigation and planning. This discovery led to the decision to replace Solomon Solis-Cohen Elementary School which was serving 1,400 students in the city of Philadelphia and would be the first new elementary school for the city in 20 years.

Modern concepts of collaborative education and learning environments were implemented through community engagement with key stakeholders, community shared program space, need to minimize footprint on a limited site, and engage the neighborhood in a bold sustainable statement of the future of education in Philadelphia. Solomon Solis-Cohen’s design team including The School District of Philadelphia and their architects, Crabtree, Rohrbaugh & Associates will walk through the design process and its relative challenges that has recently moved the project from design into construction after approval by the new city school board.

The topic will focus on four learning objectives, which are approved AIA HSW Topics; collaborative process of creating interior design, holistic building design, balancing varied design experiences with safety and security and sustainable design.

Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss collaborative strategies for staff, teachers, student, community engagement and ownership of a facility and school educational program;
  2. Awareness of fiscal management in developing a holistic design that meets community expectations, school district funding, grant engagement, safety and security and long term property maintenance;
  3. Analysis of a building design that strives to expand educational spaces into traditionally non-educational space with varied learning experiences and balancing them with the security challenges this may create;
  4. Hear how a school can be implemented within the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Sustainability (OOS) goals, that is responsible for implementing Greenworks, the City’s comprehensive sustainability plan;

Competency: Educational Facility Pre-Design Planning
Manages a master planning process that combines educational planning, facilities assessment and utilization, demographic research, capital planning and educational specifications with a community-based vision to establish a plan for learning environments. This includes the ability to translate existing or aspirational instructional models to specific programming and spatial relationships.

Domain: Toolbox
Content of this session will focus on the approaches, methods and applications when transitioning from design and concept into reality, actual existence through quality performance, execution and/or product.

Beyond the Classroom: Preparing Students for the Future through Vocational Education
Thomas Paine AB Room

    1 LU

Speakers
Laura Wernick, FAIA, REFP, LEED AP, HMFH Architects, Inc.
Carl Franceschi, AIA, LEED AP, Drummey Rosane Anderson, Inc.
Jason P. McCandless
Robert P. Sanborn III
Lisa Danley

View presentation »

Historically, vocational education has provided students with hands-on learning experiences to prepare them for a specific career path.

These spaces used to be relegated to the fringes of the core academic community, but the way planners and designers are approaching vocational education today is revolutionizing teaching and learning environments. The hands-on, practical skills building CTE schools provide is valued as an experience benefiting all students in an economy that rewards critical thinking, problem solving, and STEAM proficiency. When integrated with flexible academic spaces that support evolving pedagogy, schools become incubators for innovation and prepare students for college and careers that may well not even exist yet.

Panelists from four new and proposed high schools that operate as collaborative, multi-disciplinary environments blending academic, career and technical education will discuss their specific programs. The session will examine a broad range of innovative Career Technical Educational environments that support the latest pedagogies and learning styles, and demonstrate the value of integrating academic and CTE learning spaces and demonstrate the value of integrating academic and CTE learning spaces.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand learning synergies resulting from the integration of career tech programs and academic spaces from educators
  2. Understand different, innovative models that use the physical environment to support blending career tech and academic programs
  3. Explore with educators how they are integrating vocational and academic curriculum
  4. Understand some of the regulatory and historic barriers that need to be overcome to more fully integrate academic and vocational programs

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

What, No Library!?!
Aquarium Room

    1 LU

Speakers
Colleen Simpson, Scituate Public Schools
Jason Boone, Dore & Whittier Architects
Mike Pirollo, Dore & Whittier Architects

View presentation »

What if schools had no library? Instead, could books and resources be decentralized and within hands-reach of the staff and students?

What happens to the Media Specialist? This is what the architects at Dore & Whittier asked themselves as they designed the new Lester J. Gates Middle School in Scituate, MA.

Yes, there is no actual library, at least in the traditional sense. There is no designated room or destination, and there is no repository of books. Instead, stacks are disseminated throughout the school, at hands-reach of grade-level students in their extended learning commons. But, is this new concept working? Does this new imagined environment or lack thereof encourage more reading, more discovery, more learning? Our session entitled What, no Library!?! will cover answers to these questions and much more.

Participants will hear from Educational Facilities Planners at D&W who will share the background on why and how the idea of a decentralized library experience came to be. Gates Middle School Media Specialist Colleen Simpson will discuss the educational advantages and disadvantages of this approach. Participants will also hear from Gates Middle School students who will share how the reimagined concept of “library” has been working so far. The session will conclude with a panel discussion where attendees will be invited to pose questions to the speaker in a real-time discussion.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the educational advantages and disadvantages of decentralized media centers
  2. Understand the design and operational considerations related to a decentralized media center
  3. Understand how a media center specialist may manage the daily operations of a decentralized media center
  4. Understand how students react to and use a decentralized media center concept

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2019 | 10:45 – 11:45 AM
Project-based Learning in a Sustainable School: A Key to Supporting Young Adult Success
Cambridge Room

    1 LU

Speakers
Jody Ellenby, Ed.M, Mundo Verde Bilingual Public Charter School
Kristin Scotchmer, Mundo Verde Bilingual Public Charter School
Todd Ray, FAIA, LEED-Ap, Page Southerland Page

View presentation »

This session will provide participants with an applied understanding of the key components of a project-based sustainability education framework developed and implemented by Mundo Verde Bilingual Public Charter School. Mundo Verde is the first and only school in the District of Columbia focusing on Education for Sustainability. Grounded in research-based best practices, Mundo Verde taps into children’s innate curiosity about nature and language and uses hands-on project- and place-based learning techniques. The session will first provide each participant with a deep understanding of the technical components of our project-based sustainability education framework. It will then ground the audience in research-based holistic educational practices that lead to successful outcomes for young people, by connecting participants to how education for sustainability supports the development of Agency in youth. Agency is the ability to make choices about and take an active role in one’s life - one of the three key factors allowing a young adult to manage and adapt to changing demands and successfully navigate various settings with different cultures and expectations (Foundations for Young Adult Success A Developmental Framework, 2015). The session will then provide concrete examples of the curricular framework in action - such as showcasing 3rd grade students efforts to convince the DC Water Board to adopt better environmentally focused policies. We will conclude by providing participants with time and feedback to consider how this model could be adapted for use in their context. On the Mundo Verde Campus - Our campus is a framework for project-based learning grounded in sustainability/natural systems.

Completed in 2015, the campus consists of two buildings: a renovated historic Elementary school (certified LEED Gold) and a new Pre- K+K annex (certified LEED Platinum). The school’s buildings/ landscapes are dynamic partners in the growth of children into life-long learners and stewards of the environment.

Learning Objectives
  1. Upon completion, participants will be able to list the key components of a project-based sustainability education framework.
  2. Upon completion, participants will be to connect the components of project-based educational framework to research on successful outcomes for young people.
  3. Upon completion, participants will be to describe an even champion a Mundo Verde classroom in which young people are agents of change.
  4. Upon completion, participants will be to consider how this project-based sustainability educational program could be adapted for use in their own local/county-level context.

Competency: Educational Visioning
Exhibits an understanding of best and next practices related to educational leadership, programming, teaching, learning, planning and facility design. Establishes credibility with educators, community members and design professional while conceiving and leading a community-based visioning process. Demonstrates the ability to articulate the impact of learning environments on teaching and learning and uses that ability to facilitate a dialogue that uncovers the unique needs and long-range goals of an educational institution and its stakeholders – translating that into an actionable written/graphic program of requirements for the design practitioner.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

A Space That is Worthy of its Students
Crispus Attucks Room

    1 LU

Speakers
Emily Grandstaff-Rice, Arrowstreet
Larry Spang, Arrowstreet
Scott Oran, Board Chair, Brooke Charter Schools

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In Fall 2018, the Brooke Charter High School celebrated the opening of a new high school and 8th Grade Academy. Different than traditional public schools and private schools, charter schools both define and fund their program in unique ways. Hear from the designers and the educators on the redevelopment of the former State Hospital site, working with the community and stakeholders, defining what 21st century school designed for success looks like, and the school's experience in this new facility in the first year.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the differences in programming a typical school and an urban charter school.
  2. Learn about the site restrictions and the permitting process required to make the project a reality.
  3. Discuss how the educational philosophy of Brooke Charter High Schools translates into the spaces designed.
  4. Learn about the unique challenges along the way both from the design and construction side in this recent case study.

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Context
Content of this session will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that that distinguish the project from other applications.

How Brand Brings A Community Together
Thomas Paine AB Room

    1 LU

Speakers
Brooke Trivas, MCPPO, LEED AP BD+C, Perkins+Will
Keith Curtis, Perkins+Will
Thomas Murphy, Billerica Memorial High School

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At their core, brands can support a common vision and mission, spark emotional human connections, trigger pride and motivation, and create a sense of belonging, engagement, and ownership. A brand is more than a logo—it is the unique DNA of an organization that embodies value and represents promise. Branding is the new tool of K–12 environments, communicating stories that support successful educational outcomes. Our clients have been working with our Branded Environments team to intentionally transform the exterior and interior of buildings to experientially communicate their community’s personality, aspirations, values, and expectations. Speakers will use specific case studies to illustrate how the successful integration of brand and architecture can establish a sense of identity and narrative that unifies students, teachers, administrators, and communities at large.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the potential role of a school’s brand in a unified community message.
  2. Identify what disciplines (i.e. architecture, interior design, graphic design) are required to develop an effective brand.
  3. Develop and leverage brand messaging to unify people at varying scales (individual, group, community) and across stakeholder groups (student, teacher, administrator, and community).
  4. Employ specific visioning + discovery techniques to discover and develop a brand.

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Context
Content of this session will focus on the circumstances that form the setting for the design and construction of specific learning environments and characteristics that that distinguish the project from other applications.

All Students are Not Alike: Accommodating Diverse Student Needs through Varieties of Meaningful Learning Environments
Aquarium Room

    1 LU/HSW

Speakers
Pip Lewis, AIA, LEED AP, HMFH Architects, Inc.
Cathy Offenberg, ASLA, CRJA-IBI Group
Jennifer Buller, Coolidge Corner School
David O’Hara, Coolidge Corner School
Erin Gallentine, Town of Brookline

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When it comes to student learning styles, one size does not fit all. Student needs vary: while some may learn best in a busy, highly collaborative environment, others may prefer quiet, solitary spaces. When designing schools, it is essential to consider students as individuals with unique learning needs.

In this session, we will examine ways that the design of a large new school building on an urban site accommodates differences between students. Members from the architectural design team, landscape architecture team, and school administration will discuss the ways in which design was used to assure each child’s success.

Using Brookline’s newly opened PK-8 Coolidge Corner School as a case study, we will share design principles and strategies employed to extend the learning environment in both large-scale and intimate ways—from the classroom to the schoolyard. To break up the large scale, smaller learning neighborhoods allow students to feel comfortable and safe, surrounded by familiar people and places within their grade groups. The school’s site design provides unique opportunities to extend learning beyond the school building into the surrounding landscape, which contains a rain garden, natural play elements, and student gardens. These moments, both in the school building and outdoors, encourage each child to find his or her place in a stimulating environment of hands-on group and individual learning. This session will discuss the ways these elements serve students in meaningful ways from both a design and educational perspective.

Learning Objectives
  1. Learn ways to work with the size of a building to create varied learning experiences at different scales
  2. Examine the use of a diverse array of interior and exterior spaces to expand the range of activities and experiences for students.
  3. Examine how the relationship between the building and site create meaningful learning opportunities.
  4. Learn about the collaborative design process and discuss strategies for balancing competing stakeholder needs.

Competency: Design of Educational Facilities
Acts as a resource to the design team in providing ongoing guidance and support to ensure that the emerging and ultimate design aligns with the established community vision, education goals, future programming, written design standards, best/next practices and education policy.

Domain: Learning
Content of this session will focus on how we learn and/or how the physical environment responds specifically to various methods of instruction, pedagogies, learning styles, or learning trends.

SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 2019 | 9:00 – 11:00 AM
Closing Keynote: Safer Schools by Design – Factual, Practical Approaches for Safer, More Respectful and Effective Schools

    2 LU/HSW

Keynote Speaker
Michael Dorn, Executive Director, Safe Havens International

This powerful, fast-paced and information-packed presentation will debunk many common and deadly myths about safety in American K12 schools. This session is based on extensive research, information gleaned while providing post-incident experience for more than 300 school crisis events, the results of more than 6,800 school safety, security, climate, culture and emergency preparedness assessments of K12 schools and the presenter’s 36 years of experience in the campus safety field. This session will focus on three important areas that can and should influence new school construction, renovation projects and selection of school safety technology, hardware and target hardening approaches:
  1. Patterns of School Safety Incidents that Should Shape School Design and Operations
  2. Common Misperceptions and Dangers of Simple Solutions
  3. Safer and More Connected Schools

This highly visual section will draw on the presenter’s hundreds of thousands of photographs of schools around the world to help participants understand how to prevent a prison-like environment. This section will explain how research-based approaches can be used not only to help prevent a prison-like environment when ramping up school security, but how to enhance school climate and culture as well. The presenter will provide a variety of examples that have been helpful to architects, engineers, project owners, school facilities personnel, security personnel and school administrators across the United States, Canada, Kenya, Vietnam, India, Israel and other countries.

Learning Objectives
  1. Learn how simplistic and popular approaches to school design for safety are resulting in serious injuries, increased risk of sexual violence, deaths and successful post-incident litigation. Participants will learn concepts that can help reduce these types of risk through thoughtful building design and utilization.
  2. Review pros and cons when choosing doors with glass, designing "safe zones", choosing monitoring systems and designing for passive monitoring
  3. Gain a more accurate understanding of school violence as well as the types of school safety incidents unrelated to violence that cause approximately 75% of fatalities on K12 school campuses.
  4. Learn how to create schools where it is easier to supervise students, detect threats, reduce the risks of sexual violence while improving school climate and culture by softening necessary security measures.
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