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Previous Conferences & Symposia > Tempe Symposium

Tempe Symposium

Co-sponsored by the Council of Educational Facility Planners International and the
Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University

What's Next for Sustainable Schools and Communities

Today, as K-12 schools work to achieve sustainability, they face the issues of rising costs for maintenance and operations, lack of funding for special programs, new curriculum development around sustainability, and difficulties in connecting with their communities on broader sustainability initiatives. "What's Next for Sustainable Schools and Communities", a one-day symposium jointly sponsored by the Global Institute of Sustainability and the Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI), will explore these issues through a set of plenary sessions and break-out sessions with speakers from across the country.

The Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) is the only professional organization whose principal purpose is improving the places where children learn. CEFPI embraces a diverse group of professionals with one single goal - building healthy, safe, high performance and sustainable learning environments that enhance student and teacher performance and support culture and community vitality.

The Global Institute of Sustainability is the hub of Arizona State University's sustainability initiatives. The Institute advances research, education, and business practices for an urbanizing world. Its School of Sustainability, the first of its kind in the U.S., offers transdisciplinary degree programs to create practical solutions for environmental, economic, and social challenges

WHEN

February 10, 2012
8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Reception
4:30 - 6:00 p.m.

 

WHERE

Global Institute of Sustainability
Arizona State University
Wrigley Hall, 800 S. Cady Mall
Tempe, Arizona

About the Council of Educational Facility Planners International:
The Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) is the only professional organization whose principal purpose is improving the places where children learn. CEFPI embraces a diverse group of professionals with one single goal – building healthy, safe, high performance and sustainable learning environments that enhance student and teacher performance and support culture and community vitality.

About the Global Institute of Sustainability:
The Global Institute of Sustainability is the hub of Arizona State University's sustainability initiatives. The Institute advances research, education, and business practices for an urbanizing world. Its School of Sustainability, the first of its kind in the U.S., offers transdisciplinary degree programs to create practical solutions for environmental, economic, and social challenges.

SPONSORS

Orcutt | Winslow Turner
Tandus Flooring


PROGRAM AT A GLANCE

Subject to change
AIA and GBCI CEU's Available


Friday, February 10, 2012
7:30 am – 8:00 am Coffee and Registration
Remains open throughout the day as registration, meeting and coffee station
8:00 am – 10:00 am Welcome
Chuck Redman, Founding Director, GIOS

The ASU Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools Program: Best Practices for Effective Partnerships
Auriane Koster, GK-12 Fellow, Global Institute of Sustainability
Sandra Rodegher

This presentation will provide an overview of the ASU Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools project, which is currently in its third year of a five year National Science Foundation grant program. For the past three years, ASU graduate students have worked with Valley High schools to develop sustainability projects and curriculum that impact the classroom, the campus and the community. The presentation will provide an overview of the Sustainable Schools program mission and goals, with a description of "best practices' that have supported the development of working partnerships with schools and teachers. The presentation will also highlight current involvement in several innovative sustainability projects at single high schools, and work efforts across an entire school district.

GBCI Credit: 2

10:00 am – 10:15 am Refreshment Break
10:15 am – 11:45 am Breakout Sessions (3)

Is Net Zero Right for Everyone?
Melissa Wilfong, LEED AP BD+C, Senior Associate, Grimm and Parker Architects
Amy Upton, LEED AP BD+C Senior Associate, Director of Environmental Design, Grimm and Parker Architects
Jeffrey Caldwell, PE, LEED AP, James Posey Architects

There are many valuable goals set by school systems across the country in their quest to achieve the highest quality education. A goal that is becoming more prevalent is to be a Net Zero Energy school. At the core of this goal is the need to minimize the building energy usage at the same time we provide a source of renewable energy to offset that use - all within our limited budgets. In this process there are several decisions along the way that affect the development of the building and the education spaces inside it. We must make some trade-offs in every building we design. We propose to lead a discussion session with these tradeoffs in mind. After dividing the audience into separate groups and assigning them roles of various stakeholders, each group will be asked a series of questions for discussion. These discussions and case studies will examine those trades-offs as they specifically relate to Net Zero Energy school design. At the end of the session, each group will have a better understanding of the steps to a successful Net Zero Energy School Building.

GBCI Credit: 1.5

Can A School's Location Make A Kid Fat?
Brian Fellows, Coordinator of the Arizona Safe Routes To School Program, Arizona Department of Transportation

The Centers For Disease Control have declared a childhood obesity epidemic. The lack of physical activity is the prime culprit. The built environment around schools can either prevent or encourage physical activity among kids and adults - e.g., walking and bicycling to school. As schools have drastically reduced school PE and recess, other forms of physical activity are essential. This interactive presentation will explain the "power" of the built environment to affect such behavior, and involve participants in using the ADOT Safe Routes To School "Active School Neighborhood Checklist" to quantify and score specific school sites.

View presentation 3.24 MB PPT

GBCI Credit: 1.5

Making Schools Truly Sustainable: Creating Organisms which Change Over Time to Reflect Needs and Pedagogies Rather than Hoping to 'Future Proof'
Marcus Orlovsky, Bryanston Square Consulting Ltd

Education planners try to future proof buildings.Yet educators know that pedagogies, needs, measurements, are all in rapid change.As a result facilities are needed which allow users to change over time, so that successors can make them their own. We will share our experience of working with thousands of educators and students across Europe, and the results of 400,000 user comments on our decision support tools & longitudinal post occupancy reviews of over 120 schools. All reveal interesting and counter intuitive results. We will show the answers to 'I wish I'd known then what I know now'.

GBCI Credit: 1.5

11:45 am – 1:00 pm Lunch
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Breakout Sessions (3)

Building as a Teaching Tool: Connecting Curriculum, Culture, and the Physical Environment
Stephanie Barr, Institute for the Built Environment at Colorado State University
Craig Schiller, Build to Teach Consulting LLC.

How can we design and operate high-performance schools that actively engage and educate students in sustainability? Taking green schools beyond a physical shell, to an active, dynamic green learning environment requires more than just visible green building features. A holistic approach, driven by both educators and building professionals, is needed to integrate sustainability into building design, curriculum, organizational culture, and a community at large. Only through this holistic integration is a building truly a teaching tool. Utilizing case studies and recent research, this session will define principles, provide a framework, and present tools for creating a school building that teaches.

View presentation

GBCI Credit: 1.5

Arizona's First NetZero School: The Fort Huachuca Project
Tony Wall, President, 3W Management
Dr. Ronda Frueauff, Superintendent, Fort Huachuca Accommodation Schools
Chuck Tyler, Principal, Fanning Howey Architects
Jim Benya, President, Benya Lighting Design
Richard Clutter, Principal, EMC2 Architects
Michael Deane, Chief Sustainability Officer, Turner Construction Company

Members of the Development Team for The NEW Colonel Smith Middle School Complex, in Fort Huachuca, Arizona will discuss the process in developing Arizona's first NETZERO school facility. The Team will address the process of establishing sustainable project principles relevant to the school district military community, the modeling process used to achieve NETZERO energy standards, the legal issues relating to Arizona statutes for Power Purchase Agreements and how we measure energy usage and production, water harvesting and other building functions for student access and use in project related educational experiences. We will utilize a series of visual images, video and interactive techniques to deliver our story and to have the audience involved in the presentation.

GBCI Credit: 1.5

How Many Cooks Does a Sustainable Project Take?: A Case Study for School Planning in an Activist Community
Brian Carter, AIA, REFP Integrus Architecture
Kas Kinkead, Principal, Cascade Design Collaborative
Laurie Pfarr, Principal, LPD Civil Engineering

The sustainable design efforts of today continue to evolve and become more complex, greatly expanding the tools that designers and school districts have at hand, and creating more special interests, unique funding sources, and long term community stewardship that all now have a place at the table as we discuss sustainable strategies. This session will both highlight, and recreate, the sustainable planning strategies utilized for the Vashon Island High School modernization project. VHS is a small high school in an isolated rural community of highly motivated, educated community activists in Washington State.

GBCI Credit: 1.5

2:45 pm – 3:00 pm Refreshment Break
3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

"Where is My Hub?" Students Perspective on Learning Spaces
Caroline Lobo, Orcutt | Winslow

Designing a School that caters to all of the aspects of learning is crucial to the success of a well designed school. A school that caters not just to the functional aspects of delivering instruction, student flow from one space to another, green design aspects but also the one that pays equal attention to student creativity, social and emotional needs with the idea of promoting the concept of a "Whole School". This interactive session will focus on understanding these nuances from the perspective of students. The session will end with lessons learned and an intellectual discussion on a learner based school design.

GBCI Credit: 1.5

4:30 pm – 6:00 pm Reception at University Club, Arizona State University